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IPSWICH 
VP 




. . 







WSON 
KEEPS: 

s >>Ol)TS 



■■ 




wich Rm 
.105 
wich 




ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICt 

1990 




Board of Selectmen: 

Seated (1-r) James R. Engel (Chairman), Charles J. Wayne 

Standing (1-r) Patrick J. McNally, William E. George, William I. Walton 



Cover: Photograph courtesy of the Ipswich Chronicle 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1990 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 



1990 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 2, 1990 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 7 

October 22, 1990 Special Town Meeting 41 

Board of Selectmen 78 

Town Manager 79 

Animal Control 80 

Assessor's Office 80 

Building Department 81 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 81 

Civil Defense 82 

Commuter Rail Committee 82 

Conservation Commission 83 

Counci 1 -on-Agi ng 84 

Electric Department 84 

Fire Department ' 84 

Hall -Haskell House Standing Committee 85 

Harbors 86 

Heal th Department 86 

Historical Commission 87 

The Ipswich Arts Council 88 

Ipswich Housing Authority 89 

Library 90 

Planning Board 91 

Police Department 92 

Public Works Department 93 

Recreation and Youth Department 94 

Shel 1 f i sh Department : 96 

School Committee 96 

Superi ntendent 97 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 99 

Winthrop School 100 

Ipswich Middle School 101 

Ipswich High School 102 

Department of Special Services 103 

Town Clerk 104 

Elections and Registrations 106 

Town Counsel 106 

Treasurer/Col lector 108 

Water/Sewer Departments 108 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 110 

Zoning Board of Appeals Ill 

Master Plan Commission Ill 

Town of Ipswich Revenue Sharing Handicapped Regulations 112 

Financial Statements - Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1990 113 

-1- 



CONSTABLE 
Joyce A. Gysan 



1990 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 
ELECTED 
1991 



E HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Robert E. Como 




1991 


Catherine Cecil 




1995 


Sarah S. O'Connor, Ch 




1994 


Arthur Weagle 




1993 


Loretta Dietch/State 




1991 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 






Jeffrey Simon, dfe 




1992 


Cynthia Quinn £-H 




1992 


David Pauley 




1993 


Margot Sherwood 




1991 


Carl Soderland Joseph 


iXbcf&r^ 


1991 


Norman Sheppard 




1993 


Lawrence E. Seidler 




1993 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

E2 Elected At Town Meeting 

Walter Pojasek 1993 

^o*^§e-t3ewe4-l cfc>4 p Fincfi ±9$±- 

Constance Surpitski 1992 

03 Appointed By Moderator 

William Craft, Ch 1991 

Jamie Fay 1993 

Alice Shurcliff 1992 

S Appointed By Selectmen 

Leonard Heurlin 1993 
Alien Swan Geoff req P< HoniQggi 



TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 



1991 



Lawrence Pszenny 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Patrick J. McNally 
Charles J. Wayne 
James R. Engel 
William I. Walton 
William E. George 



SI ACCOUNTANT 
Barry Boyce 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Ml BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Joseph Ferruzzi 

Ml CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 
James E. Graff urn 

Ml DOG OFFICER/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

Ml ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Edwin R. Emerson 

Willard Maker, Acting Chief 

Ml HARBORMASTER 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Ml HEALTH AGENT 

Domenic A. Badolato 

Ml LIBRARIAN 
Eleanor Gaunt 

Ml TOWN PLANNER 

Elizabeth M. Ware 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 



1992 



1993 
1992 
1993 
1992 
1991 



Charles D. Surpitski 

Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 
Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Elizabeth Dorman 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 
Philip Kent 

7 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Ml TOWN CLERK 

Frances A. Richards 

Ml TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 



S TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

Ml DEPUTY COLLECTOR 

Will i am E. Handren, Jr. 

SI ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT MANAGER 
Donald R. Stone 



-2- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M 


CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 






Arthur N. Sotis 


1991 




Nicholas Markos 


1993 




Gordon C. Player 


1992 


M 


CIVIL DEFENSE 






David Clements, Dir 


1991 




John T. Clogston, Asst 


1991 


S 


COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 






Dorcas Rice 


1991 




Vivian Endicott 


1991 




Joseph Carl in 


1991 




Wil 1 iam Varrel 1 , Ch 


1991 




Anne Teele 


1991 




Harold B. Kapell 


1991 




Wil 1 iam Faissler 


1991 


M6 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 






Lillian V. North, Ch 


1993 




Joseph M. Pecoraro 


1993 




Wayne M. Castonguay 


1993 




Nicholas A. Vontzalides 


1991 




Jim Berry 


1991 




Richard A. Nylen, Jr. 


1992 




William Barton 


1992 


S 


COUNCIL ON AGING 






Winfred Hardy, Ch 


1992 




Jeanne N. Parker 


1992 




Helen Drenth 


1993 




Rita Poirier 


1991 




Anthony Christopher 


1991 




Ansel B. Clark 


1992 




Deborah P. Bouranis 


1993 


S 


FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 






George E. Howe, Dir. 


1991 




Tone Kenney 


1991 




Sara O'Connor 


1991 



M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley 
Susan Nelson 
Donald Curiale, Ch 
Arthur L . Diol i , Jr. 
Wil 1 iam S. Effner 
Marjorie H. Robie 
Richard B. MacKinnon 



S GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Peter J. Dziadose 1991 

Kris Muench 1991 

Kathleen Mersereau 1991 

Carolyn Britt 1991 

John H. Plate 1991 

Phillip F. Grenier 1991 

M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank J. Ragonese 1993 

John D. Heaphy 1992 

John Moberger 1991 



1991 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1991 
1992 
1991 



S INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING 
AUTHORITY 

George E. Howe, Ch 1991 

James C. Lahar 1992 

Loretta Dietch 1995 

Susan C. Hubbard 1993 

S IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 





Mary Weatherall 


1991 




Mary Pol 1 ak 


1991 




Georgina Jill Traverso,Ch 


1992 




Jon Aaron, Co-Ch 


1992 




Kristin Ledson 


1992 




Michele S. McGrath 


1992 




Jane Harold 


1992 




Chip Dort 


1992 




Ann L. Marsh 


1992 


s 


LIBRARY TRUSTEES 






Crocker Snow, Sr., Ch 


1992 




Donald M. Greenough 


1993 




Hubert Johnson 


1993 




Lawrence Pszenny 


1993 




Martha Gillespie 


1991 




Virginia Jackson 


1991 




Bette Siege! 


1992 




Louise Sweet ser 


1992 




George R. Gray 


1991 




MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 




cc 


Carl Gardner 


1991 


s 


Charles J. Wayne 


1991 


s 


Benjamin Fierro, III 


1991 


s 


Patrick J. McNally 


1991 


ZBA 


Donald Turbide 


1991 


ZBA 


James Theodosopoulos 


1991 


HC 


Irene Josephson 


1991 


HC 


Richard MacKinnon 


1991 


PB 


Leslie Brooks 


1991 


FC 


Leonard R. Heurlin 


1991 


CC 


Barbara Ostberg 


1991 



-3- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 



Vivian Endicott, 


1991 


Theresa Stephens, Co-Ch 


1991 


Helen M. Burr 


1991 


Stephanie Gaskins, Co-Ch 


1991 


Willi am L . Thoen 


1991 


Marion Frost 


1991 


Ingrid Miles 


1991 


Norman Quint 


1991 


Joanne McMahon 


1991 


M BOARD OF HEALTH 




Carl G. Hiltunen 


1993 


Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 


1991 


Susan C. Hubbard 


1992 


M RECREATION COMMISSION 




Jim Prato 


1993 


Bruce Bryant 


1991 


Linda M. Murphy 


1992 


James W. Foley 


1993 


Marcia Ford 


1993 


Lawrence Drown 


1991 


Nancy C. Lindquist 


1992 


5 REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 




Mary Maloney 


1991 


Edmund Traverso 


1993 


Peter M. Ross 


1992 


11 Frances A. Richards, Clerk 




; SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 




Thomas Dorman, Ch 


1991 


Melvin A. Bowen 


1991 


Alice H. Thanos 


1991 


Andrew Gianakakis 


1991 


Forrest W. MacGilvary 


1991 


Anthony Christopher 


1991 


Wayne Castonguay 


1991 


5 WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 




James Engel , Ch 


1991 


Robert 0. Butcher 


1991 


Scott Greeley 


1991 


Gerald Priestman 


1991 


Leonard Heurlin 


1991 


Peter Jean 


1991 


5 WATERWAYS- ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




George C. Scott, Jr. 


1991 


Gary J. Hamilton, Ch. 


1991 


Marc C. Silverman 


1991 


Richard R. Willis 


1991 



PLANNING BOARD 

William E. Bingham 1991 

Stanley Bornstein 1992 

Leslie Brooks 1993 

Kenneth Savoie 1995 

Catherine Lefebvre 1994 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Ch 1992 

Dana P. Jordan 1991 

David Levesque 1993 

William J. Murphy 1994 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1995 

John R. Verani , Associate 1991 

Joseph R. Petranek, Assoc. 1991 



M GAS INSPECTOR 
Robert Hyde 

M PARKING CLERK 
Wil 1 iam Handren 

M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Robert Hyde 

M WIRING INSPECTOR 
Raymond Budzianowski 



APPOINTMENT LEGEND 

E Elected 

S Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

M Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

1 Supervised By Town Manager 

2 Elected At Town Meeting 

3 Appointed By Moderator 

4 General Laws 

5 1976 STM, Article II 

6 Confirmed by Board of Selectmen 

7 Appointed by School Committee 

8 Appointed by Conservation Com. 



-4- 



1990 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 

affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE 

SECOND DAY OF APRIL, 1990, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to 

act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes announced at 7:30 p.m. that there were 730 voters pre- 
sent but many people were still waiting to check in, and asked for a ten- 
minute adjournment. So voted. At 7:50 p.m., the Meeting was called to 
order. The final count was 1007. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were Beth Graffum, David Grimes, Donald 
Curiale, Dennis Quinn, Steven Fortado, John Langmaid. 

The Moderator thanked the Board of Selectmen and various officials who had 
helped in preparing for this Town Meeting. 

It was moved to admit non-voters. 

ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Selectman Robert Leet moved that the salaries and compensation of all elected 
Town officers be approved as presented in the budget. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried on una- 
nimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator 
for one (1) year; two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years; one (1) member of 
the Housing Authority for five (5) years; and three (3) members of the School 
Committee for three (3) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling 
places as follows: Precinct 1--Agawam Village Recreation Hall, County Road; 
Precinct 2--Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3--Ipswich High School, 
High Street; Precinct 4--Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on 
Monday, April 9, 1990. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 
8:00 p.m.; or to take any other action relative- thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote 

ARTICLE 3 

To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee for three (3) years. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town elect Walter Pojasek to the 
Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. Seconded. Mr. George and 
Finance Chairman William Craft spoke highly of Mr. Pojasek and his service to 
the Town, formerly on the School Committee and then on the Finance Committee. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

-5- 



ARTICLE 4 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the 
municipal budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the 
ensuing year's operations, including the compensation of elected Town 
Officers; and further to authorize the establishment of a revolving fund for 
the collection and expenditure of solid waste disposal tipping charges under 
the provisions of MGL Chapter 44, Section 53E; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Craft moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$6,291,302 for the purposes indicated in the FY91 Operating Budget as 
outlined in the Finance Committee Report, pp 18-20; and further moved that 

For the Operating Budget of $6,291,302, the Town: 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) $ 754,994 

Sewer, Water & Street Betterments 21,501 

Overlay Surplus: To Reserve Fund 20,000 
Cemetery Perpetual Care & Flower Fund: 

Offset Cemetery Budget 28,060 

Sewer System Evaluation Survey (4/6/87, Art .37) 2,074 

Dirt Pile (Art. 2, 9/19/88 STM) 937 

Insurance Fund ($10,000) 30,002 

Low Income Housing (Art. 10, 6/20/88 STM) 232 

Computers (Art. 30, 4/2/84 ATM) 55 
Wetlands Protection Fund: Offset Conservation 

Commission Budget 1,142 

$ 858,997 

Transfer from Revenue Sharing 2,211 

Available Funds & Revenue Sharing 861,208 

Net to be raised and assessed: $5,430,094; 

and further, to authorize the establishment of a revolving fund for the 
collection and expenditure of solid waste tipping charges under the provi- 
sions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E. Seconded. 
Following a long discussion on overrides, trash collection, etc., the 
question was moved, seconded and carried on a two-thirds voice vote. On the 
motion, the Moderator declared in carried on a voice vote. Seven voters 
stood to protest. On the handcount, the motion carried 738-100. 



-6- 



MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



FY88 FY89 FY90 * FY91 
EXPENDED EXPENDED APPRO. RECOMMENDED 



003 SELECTMEN: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

005 TOWN MANAGER: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Labor Consultants 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

009 MODERATOR: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 

011 FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

02 5 ACCOUNTANT: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

029 ASSESSORS: 

Salaries & Wages 
Valuation Fee 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

03 3 TREASURER/ COLLECTOR: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



$16,767 

1,754 



18,521 


$17,330 

2,611 



19,941 


$16,505 

3,835 



20, 340 


$16,505 

2,955 



19,460 


89, 197 

20,871 

11,308 

4 ,458 

125,834 


96, 350 

19,497 

3,894 

13,578 

133, 319 


102,787 

23,557 

5,000 



131, 344 


104, 106 

22,780 

5, 000 



131,886 


100 



100 


100 



100 


100 

10 

110 


100 

10 

110 



2,475 
2,475 



2,963 
2,963 



2,975 
2,975 



3,225 
3,225 


8,061 

5,991 

14,052 


13,355 

2,704 

16,059 


8,851 

6,770 

15,621 


16, 030 

6, 300 

22, 330 


89,679 

25,697 



115,376 


94,940 

22,386 



117,326 


102, 346 

25,638 



127,984 


83,948 

27,583 

4,090 

115,621 


78,941 

114,662 

9,891 



2 03,-4 94 


89,390 
1,340 

10,031 

488 

101,549 


94,564 

5,200 

11,032 

500 

111,296 


97,840 

3,500 

11, 128 



112,468 


91,540 

8,631 



100,171 


87,393 

12,760 

4,426 

104,579 


94,550 

14,185 

1, 600 

110,335 


90,095 

15,367 

320 

105,782 



-7- 






03 9 TOWN CLERK: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

D4 5 LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Town Counsel-Litigation 
Special Counsel 
Expenses 
Total 

)61 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

)63 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Planning Consultants: 

Reimbursable 

General 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

64 MASTER PLAN COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 
Total 

6 5 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



FY88 

EXPENDED 


FY89 

EXPENDED 


FY9 * 
APPRO. I 


FY91 

tECOMMENDE 


38,734 
2,329 
5,865 

46,928 


42,030 

2,717 

775 

45,522 


46,647 

3,070 

175 

49,892 


37,147 

3,482 



40,629 


12,000 

28,720 



1,410 

42,130 


12,000 

29, 378 



2,412 

43,790 


12,960 
28, 000 
10, 000 
2,580 
53,540 


12,960 
28,000 
10, 000 
2,580 
53,540 


1,012 

305 



1,317 


1,650 

235 



1,885 


3,000 

701 



3,701 


3,000 

701 



3,701 


42,006 
2,113 


43,390 
2,681 


49,458 
7,930 


13,524 
2,950 




2,780 



46,899 




7,350 

1,827 

55,248 




52,000 



109, 388 




30,000 

500 

46,974 


690 



315 

1,005 


695 

539 

3,112 

4,346 


1,000 
1,100 
5, 100 
7,200 


1,000 
100 
600 

1,700 


18,105 

15,625 

5,031 

70,996 

109,757 


19,523 

15,843 

6,386 

6,733 

48,485 


21,707 

18,235 

6,750 

2,300 

48,992 


23,294 

18,476 

6,620 

544 

48,934 


828,059 


695,112 


792,718 


706,360 



UBLIC SAFETY 



01 POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Drug Enforcement Fund 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



741 


687 


780 


179 


881 


896 


917 


841 


27, 


872 


35 


753 


30 


952 


37 


253 


28, 


700 


28 


290 


31 


718 


31 


356 












1, 


000 


1, 


000 


34 


121 


42 


919 


175 


496 


29, 


722 


832 


380 


887 


141 


1,121 


062 


1,017, 


172 



-8- 



FY88 
EXPENDED 



FY89 
EXPENDED 



FY90 * 
APPRO. 



FY91 

RECOMMENDED 



102 HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

103 FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Training 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 





3,397 

386 

15,463 

19,246 



532,901 

3,036 

32,304 

4,758 

20,293 

593,292 



67,500 

17,477 

2,457 

976 

88,410 





5,030 

316 

1,614 

6,960 



571,201 

3,297 

59,190 

4,247 

47,674 

685,609 



77, 148 

23,011 

2,298 

946 

103,403 





4,585 

850 

8,450 

13,885 



637,427 

2,475 

65,532 

5,270 

210,295 

920,9-99 



81, 148 

26,018 

2,727 

15,000 

124,893 



3,664 

4,706 

775 

4,483 

13,628 



665,133 

4,175 

50,160 

5,470 

11,000 

735,938 



Note: In 1991 Forestry is funded by Article 23 Contingent on Override passing, 



112 SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

113 BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Inspection Consultant 
Energy Supplies 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

131 CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

133 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



27,900 

440 

1,911 

622 

1,375 

32,248 



38,787 



332 

5,115 

2,001 

46,235 



2, 400 

1,855 





4,255 



18,250 

2,428 

639 



21,317 



28,560 

900 

2,462 

451 



32,373 



42,427 



149 

3,488 

12,309 

58,373 



3, 000 

1,997 





4,997 



19,345 

4, 110 

252 

8,487 

32, 194 



38,122 

1,500 

2,400 

700 



42,722 



48,759 

5,000 

360 

3,471 

540 

58,130 



3,000 

2, 125 

75 



5,200 



21,000 

5,015 

700 



26,715 



34,622 



4,225 

700 



39,547 



46,143 



360 

8,725 



55,228 



3 


, 000 


1 


,950 












4 


,950 


22 


224 


5 


382 




500 




200 


28, 


306 



1,637,383 1,811,050 2,313,606 1,894,769 



-9- 



FY88 

EXPENDED 



FY89 

EXPENDED 



FY90 * 
APPRO. 



FY91 

RECOMMENDED 



PUBLIC WORKS 



301 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

303 HIGHWAY DIVISION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

3 05 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Rental 
Total 

3 09 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



50 


,755 


54,925 


58 


,356 


59 


,710 


1 


,718 


2,054 


2 


, 556 


2 


,556 




206 















52 


,679 


56,979 


60 


,912 


62 


,266 


148 


,610 


162,926 


186 


,824 


202 


,849 


130 


,913 


139,207 


148 


,967 


186 


,892 


278 


,374 


242,739 


293, 


, 000 


225 


,000 


59 


, 300 


111,525 


184, 


, 564 


22, 


, 300 


617 


, 197 


656,397 


813, 


, 355 


637, 


,041 


34, 


r 844 


18,696 


25, 


,000 


25, 


,000 


70, 


,470 


53,371 


64, 


,750 


67, 


,550 


5; 


,292 


2,248 


5, 


600 


5, 


,600 


26; 


,034 


6,745 


27, 


000 


27, 


000 


136, 


,640 


81,060 


122, 


350 


125, 


150 


25, 


381 


26,810 


28, 


640 


30, 


606 




400 















29, 


403 


28,280 


41, 


060 


39, 


971 


8, 


885 


9,538 


10, 


900 


9, 


556 


5, 


795 


13,448 












69, 


864 


78,076 


80, 


600 


80, 


133 


876, 


380 


872,512 


1,077, 


217 


904, 


590 



SANITATION 



4 03 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 
Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Sanitation Revolving Fund 
Total 

4 09 SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL SANITATION 



342,000 

33,855 



375,855 



165,977 

173., 975 

7,872 

12,701 

360,525 

736, 380 



371,000 

65,688 



436,688 



175,517 

188,227 

8,238 

13,353 

385,335 

822,023 



402, 000 

56,700 



458,700 



195,757 

203,163 

8, 142 



407, 062 

865,762 



128,500 



50,000 

178,500 



204,078 

239,281 

8,225 

5,829 

457,413 

635,913 



-10- 



FY88 
EXPENDED 



FY89 

EXPENDED 



FY90 * 
APPRO. 



FY91 

RECOMMENDED 



OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 



481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SVCS 

HUMAN SERVICES 



20 




60 


1 


000 


1 


000 


4,991 




755 


9 


200 


1 


400 


15,523 









125 







20, 534 




815 


10 


325 


2 


400 


1,400 


1 


, 600 







1 


800 


466 




527 


12 


650 


1 


275 







843 


1 


500 


1 


000 


1,866 


2 


970 


14 


150 


4, 


075 



22,400 



3,785 



24,475 



6,475 



501 HEALTH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Emergency Fund 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

551 VETERAN'S BENEFIT: 
Expenses 
Total 

571 CEMETERIES & GROUNDS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



CULTURE AND RECREATION 

601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



60,439 


69 


, 186 


77 


,016 


48 


,761 


138,789 


303 


,396 


317 


, 680 


314 


, 155 










1 


,000 


1 


,000 


172 




807 












199,400 


373 


,389 


395 


,696 


363 


,916 


8,160 


8 


743 


9 


900 


10 


000 


18,671 


20 


002 


21 


580 


22 


338 


26,831 


28 


745 


31 


480 


32 


338 


49,231 


85, 


017 


67, 


266 


125, 


000 


49,231 


85, 


017 


67, 


266 


125, 


000 


154,277 


169, 


646 


181, 


932 


195, 


308 


19,823 


21, 


629 


22, 


466 


23, 


216 


6,997 


5, 


755 


7, 


845 


7, 


105 


19,309 


14, 


588 


10, 


525 


21, 


000 


200,406 


211, 


618 


222, 


768 


246, 


629 


475,868 


698, 


769 


717, 


210 


767, 


883 



138,959 

57,561 

1,278 

11, 108 

208, 906 



157,297 

66,034 

1,268 

2,234 

226, 833 



178,220 

71, 695 

1,500 

450 

251, 865 



176,650 

71,865 

1,300 

400 

250, 215 



-11- 



FY88 

EXPENDED 



FY89 

EXPENDED 



FY9 * 
APPRO. 



FY91 

RECOMMENDED 



521 RECREATION AND YOUTH SVCS : 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Youth Services 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 



46,870 

17,389 

549 



1,074 

65,882 


53,458 

18,312 

471 

5,000 



77,241 


61,061 

21,925 

600 



22,500 

106,086 


60,747 

20,696 

555 





81,998 


274,788 


304,074 


357,951 


332,213 



JNCLASSIFIED 

381 INSURANCE: 

371 BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 

County Retirement System 

Health & Life 

Medicare 

Total 

7 01 DEBT SERVICE: 

Payment of Principal 
Payment of Interest 
Interest on Tax Ant. Notes 
Total 

391 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 



211,085 


174,492 


215 


,174 


258, 


,199 


11,138 


11,775 


17, 


,015 


17, 


,528 


330,846 


339,337 


406, 


,954 


417, 


,746 


303,443 


340,040 


136, 


,280 


166, 


,576 


14,971 


13,862 


17, 


,000 


20, 


,300 


660,398 


705,014 


577, 


,249 


622, 


150 


65,000 


24,500 


185, 


,000 







3,948 


1,076 


4, 


000 










4,111 


17, 


829 


12, 


000 


68,948 


29,687 


206, 


829 


12, 


000 



7,627 



7,303 



58, 186 



8,000 



313 RESERVE FUND (Transfers into appropriate budgets in prior years; 
funded @ $45,000 in all years) 

391 AUDIT FEE: 

391 MANAGEMENT TRANSFER ACCOUNT: ** 

391 POSTAGE: 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: $5,813,666 $6,162,674 $7,289,361 $6,291,302 

* Note: FY 90 reflects Reserve Fund, transfers to date. 

** Represents Management salary increases which in prior years have been 

incorporated in individual department budgets. The combined increase 

represents the cost of living increase of 4.6%. 









37,734 




45,000 





22,603 


30,250 




31,750 













43,000 


14,350 


16,250 


15,000 




23,000 


962,408 


955,349 


1,140,422 


1, 


043,099 



-12- 



ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School 
Committee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, 
and transfer money for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $8,516,004 for the School Department Budget for FY91 and further move 
that: 

For the School Department Budget of $8,516,004, the Town transfer 

from Avai 1 able Funds: 

Feofees of the Grammar School $4,000 

School Repairs (Art. 28, 4/7/86 ATM) 15,000 

Net to be raised and assessed: $8,497,004 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously in favor; Finance Committee unani- 
mously in favor. Superintendent Richard Thompson and School Committee 
Chairman Jeffrey Simon spoke on the financial problems. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover 
the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual operating and debt service 
expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Whittier School Committeeman Eugene Hail son moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $121,645 to cover the Town's share of the ensuing 
year's annual operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee, School Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, said sum to be offset by revenues 
of the Water Division during FY91, and to transfer a sum of money from the 
surplus account to Water capital outlay and/or debt service; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen Chairman James Engel moved that the Town ovte to raise and 
appropraite the sum of $1,093,455 for the ensuring year's expenses of the 
Water Division, said sum to be offset by revenues of the Water Department 
during FY91. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; and (2) to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money and/or to appropriate a sum of money from the 
Water Division surplus account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 



-13- 



Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $10,592.07 to 
pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

Misc. Finance Police 



Essex Office 


$400, 


.00 


Beverly Anesthesiology A 


ssoc . 


$1 


,050 


.oc 


Treasurer 






Uni systems Finance Corp 






527 


.50 


New England Telephone 


77, 


.40 


Water 










Elections & Registrations 






Badger Meter Company 






622 


.20 


CPRS Printing, Inc. 


83, 


.05 


School s 










Veterans' Benefits 






N.E. Consortium 






35 


.00 



Caldwell Nursing 7,796.92 $10,592.07 

(2) to raise this appropriation, the sums of $9,969.87 and $622.20 be trans- 
ferred, respectively, from Free Cash and Water Surplus. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. A 4/5ths vote was 
needed; the motion carried on a unanimous vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or to transfer from 
available funds, sums of money to fund supplements to the Town and School 
Operating Budgets for FY90 and the Water Division Operating Budget for FY90; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $425,569 to 
fund supplements to the Fiscal Year 1990 Municipal Operating Budget and FY 
1990 Water Division Operating Budget: 

Miscellaneous Finance 

Audit Fee $12,000 

Debt Service 

Principal 15,000 

Interest 786 

Conservation Commission 

Expenses 1,250 

Fire Department 

Salaries (Overtime) 12,000 

Veterans' Services 

Expenses 75,000 

Water Division 

Principal (SAANS) 300,000 

Interest (SAANS) 9,533 

3>425,569; 

and (2) to raise this appropriation, the sums of $116,036 and $309,533 be 
transferred, respectively, from Free Cash and from Water Surplus. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest (s) as may be 

-14- 



necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) and/or easements to Essex 
County and authorize the filing of special legi slation (s ) to help effectuate 
the same; and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Walton moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $107,025 to 
engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or ser- 
vices for the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 
90 of the General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to apply for, accept and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be 
necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) and/or easements to Essex 
County and authorize the filing of special legi slation(s) to help effectuate 
the same; and (4) of the $107,025 appropriated, the sum of $80,270 be trans- 
ferred from Available Funds and $26,775 be raised in the tax levy. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. It is planned 
to repair Jeffrey's Neck and Little Neck Roads. A 2/3rds vote was necessary; 
motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, 
design, construct, and operate a sewage sludge composting facility on a portion 
of the Town "Poor Farm", so called (Assessor's Map 13, Parcel 25) and to 
obtain any materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any grants 
or gifts from the Federal, State, or private sources for said purpose; and 
(3) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by 
borrowing, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Wayne moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $163,000 to 
survey, design, construct, and operate a sewage sludge composting facility on 
a portion of the Town "Poor Farm", so called (Assessor's Map 13, Parcel 25), 
and to obtain any materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; 
(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any 
grants or gifts from the Federal, State, or private sources for said purposes; 
and (3) to meet this appropriation, that the sum of $77,600 be raised in the 
tax levy and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
be authorized to issue $85,400 in bonds or notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(1). Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Allen Swan, for the 
Finance Committee, informed the Meeting that the State has ordered the Town 
to close the present sludge pit. In answer to a question, Mr. Howe said the 
facility would be located on the paved area where the U.S.A.F. Labs used to 
be. The Poor Farm was designated as a recreational area by Town Meeting, but 
such designation was never registered. The tax rate would not be affected by 
the borrowing this year. Jim Berry for the Conservation Commission stated 
that it would hope to have the property turned over to the Commission, but 
would not want the paved area. Discussion on method of composting. A 2/3rds 
vote was necessary; the motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 



-15- 



ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in antici- 
pation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1990, and 
ending June 30, 1991, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions 
of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; (2) to authorize 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into a 
written agreement with a banking institution for the provision of banking 
services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53F of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as inserted by Chapter 740 of the Acts of 
1985, as amended; and (3) to rescind its authorization to borrow the unissued 
balances of monies authorized under Article 9 of the June 20, 1988, Special 
Town Meeting; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see what action the Town will take with regard to the transfer of any 

surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $417,979 from the 
Surplus Account in the Electric Light Department for the purpose of reducing 
taxes. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recom- 
mended. David Warner asked if Seabrook would affect the Ipswich electric 
rates; Mr. Engel replied that we have been paying $600,000 per year on 
Seabrook' s debt service. What happens if the plant doesn't open? Mr. Engel: 
we continue paying $600,000/year . Motion carried on a unanimous vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 32B, Section 
9A of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, effective July first, nineteen 
hundred ninety-one; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By peti- 
tion) 

Mr. Clifton Wentworth moved that the Town place on the Official Ballot for 
the April 9, 1990 Election the following question to take effect July 1, 1991 

"Shall the Town pay one-half the premium costs payable by a retired 
employee for group life insurance and for group general or blanket 
hospital, surgical, medical, dental, and other insurance?" 



Yes No 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-0 against (1 abstention), Finance Committee 
unanimously against. Motion failed on a voice vote. On a hand count, the 
motion failed 414 against, 255 for. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town under and pursuant to authority granted in Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40D, Section 21(g), as amended, will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen at their discretion to negotiate and execute a 



-16- 



contract with the operator of a solid waste disposal facility for the dispo- 
sal of refuse, garbage and waste and for the use of by-products resulting 
from the operation of such facilities, which contract may 

(1) be for a term of fifteen years, more or less, or a lesser period; 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, 
garbage and waste with payments for the use of the facilities to be 
based thereon; 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and for adjustments 
thereof and for the use of steam, electricity and/or other by- 
products resulting from the use of the facilities and for credits 
or payments to the Town resulting therefrom; 

(4) provided for use by the Town or other municipalities or other users 
of the uncommitted capacity of such facilities; 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing 
general matters; and 

(6) be generally in the form of a proposed contract with RESCO, 
NESWC, or with another entity for the disposal of the Town's 
solid wastes, with any changes therein whatsoever as may be 
approved by said Board of Selectmen; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unani- 
mously recommended. Discussion on cost, whether Town would be penalized if 
it withdrew from contract. Question moved, seconded, carried on voice vote. 
Motion carried on majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's Charter 
and pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, 
Section 21C(m), as inserted by Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1989, to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to fund a contract or contracts for municipal 
refuse collection and disposal; supplements to the Health Budget and 
Miscellaneous Finance Budget to operate the Solid Waste Transfer Station; and 
otherwise to procure any and all materiel and/or services necessary and inci- 
dental to the collection and disposal of municipal refuse for FY91, including 
special municipal refuse collection services during one week each in the 
spring and fall of FY91, said appropriations to be contingent upon the 
passage of an override referendum under the provisions of MGL , Chapter 59, 
Section 21C(g); or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate an addi- 
tional sum of $671,627 for the FY91 Sanitation contract, Health, and 
Miscellaneous Finance budgets as follows: 

Sanitation Contract : 

Composit Contract $580,243 

Special Collections . 59,700 

Health : 

Salaries 26,939 

Expenses 230 

Misc. Finance : 

Workers' Compensation 3,290 

Health & Life 1,225 

$671,627; and 

(2) to reduce the FY91 Miscellaneous Finance Unemployment Compensation budget 
by $8,070; both said appropriations (a net addition of $663,557) to be con- 
tingent on the passage of a ballot referendum under the provisions of MGL 

-17- 



Chapter 59, Section 21C(g). Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Discussion on recycling, cost of trash 
pickup by private contractors. Question moved, seconded, carried on voice 
vote. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C(m), as inserted by Chapter 634 of the 
Acts of 1989, to raise and appropriate a sum of money to fund a supplement to 
the School Department Operating Budget for FY91, said appropriation to be 
contingent upon the passage of an override referendum under the provisions of 
MGL, Chapter 59, Section 21C(g); or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

School Committeeman Lawrence Seidler moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate an additional $200,000 for the FY91 School Department operating 
budget, said appropriation to be contingent upon passage of a ballot referen- 
dum under the provisions of MGL, Chapter 59, Section 21C(g). Seconded. 
School Committee, Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recom- 
mended. High School student Jeremy Dal ton spoke in favor and urged the 
Meeting to vote favorably. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, and pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 59, Section 21C(m) as inserted by Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1989, 

(1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the wages, fringe benefits, 
and expenses of the position of Town Planner for FY91; (2) to reduce the 
appropriation in the FY91 Miscellaneous Finance Unemployment Compensation 
account; both said appropriations to be contingent upon the passage of an 
override referendum under the provisions of MGL, Chapter 59, Section 21C(g); 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Wayne moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate an additional 
sum of $38,180 for wages and expenses for the Town Planner's position of FY91 
as follows: 

Planning Board 

Wages $35,934 

Expenses 500 

Miscellaneous Finance 

Health and Life Insurance 1,225 

Medicare 521 

$38,180; and 

(2) to reduce the appropriation to be raised for the FY91 Miscellaneous 
Finance Department and line item for Unemployment Compensation by $8,160; 
both said appropriations (a net addition of $30,020) to be contingent upon 
the passage of a ballot referendum under the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, 
Section 21C(g). Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously in favor; Finance 
Committee majority in favor. Planning Board strongly in favor; Patrick 
McNally -spoke on motion, as did William Bingham. Mary Conley for the 
Historical Commission, Lillian North for the Conservation Commission were 
unanimously in favor. Mr. McNally stated that the Planning Board could not 
possibly handle the work now being done by the Planner. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

-18- 



ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town, subject to the provisions of the Town's Charter, will 
raise and appropriate $40,000 for the purpose of funding the salary and 
expenses for the position of Town Planner for the fiscal year beginning July 
1, 1990; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Mr. McNally moved that the Town, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, raise and appropriate $40,000 for the purpose of funding the salary 
and expenses for the position of Town Planner for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1990. Seconded. Mr. George stated the Selectmen were opposed 3-2; 
Mr. Pzsenny stated the Finance Committee was 6-2-1 against. Finance member 
Alice Shurcliff (who, with Mr. Craft, was in the minority) felt that there 
was money in the budget to finance the Planner. Mr. Engel (who, with Mr. 
Wayne, was in the BOS minority) stated the article should be passed. Ben 
Fierro for the Master Plan Commission, urged passage. The question was 
moved, seconded, voted. The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive; on 
the hand count the motion carried 352 in favor, 57 against. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's Charter, 
(1) to instruct the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, 
and the Town Manager to fully staff the Building Department in order to pro- 
vide fair, equitable, comprehensive application monitoring and enforcement of 
the Protective Zoning Bylaw, Planning and Zoning Board Special Permits and 
Site Plan approvals in their entirety throughout the limits of the Town, but 
most especially those portions of the bylaws and Special Permits dealing spe- 
cifically with Wetland Protection and Protection of the aboveground and 
underground water supplies of the Town by the creation of the position of 
Zoning Enforcement Officer to serve under the direction of the Building and 
Zoning Official. The present policy of the Board of Selectmen of selective 
enforcement shall cease. (2) To instruct the Board of Selectmen, the Finance 
Committee and the Town Manager to retain the position of Town Planner in 
order to provide fair, equitable, comprehensive application and enforcement 
of the application and permit requirements of the Protective Zoning Bylaw and 
the Rules and Regulations of the Planning Board in all matters under the 
jurisdiction of the Planning Board, but most especially those areas dealing 
specifically with protection of the aboveground and underground water 
supplies of the Town. (3) To accomplish one and two above at a minimal cost 
to the taxpayers of the Town by funding the entire Building Department budget 
and the position of Town Planner from the receipts of user fees collected by 
those departments as follows: 

A. To adopt Chapter 44, Section 53E, MGL , to establish a Revolving 
Account by expanding the existing Revolving Account of the Plumbing and Gas 
Inspector created at the April 5, 1982 Annual Town Meeting, lifting the 50% 
cap thereof, and depositing all receipts of the Building Department and 
Planning Department into the account and paying all Building Department 
Budgeted expense items and the salary of the Town Planner and the salary 
and expenses of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector from said account. 

B. As both the Building Department and the position of Town Planner, from 
an overall standpoint, protect and represent the interest of the Town, the 
sum of $25,000 shall be deposited on July first of each year in said 
account, such sum taken from the General Fund of the Town to seed the 
Revolving Account at the beginning of each Fiscal Year to insure expenses 
are paid. This sum represents the "minimal" amount referenced above. 

-19- 



C. At the close of each Fiscal Year, all excess monies in said fund shall 
be transferred to the General Fund of the Town and made available for expen- 
diture the next Fiscal Year as provided for in Chapter 44, Section 53E, MGL . 

D. The 1991 Fiscal Year Budget for the Building Department and Town Planner 
position, salary only, shall be as provided in this article. All subsequent 
Fiscal Year Budgets shall follow the normally prescribed approval processes 
short of specific future warrant article actions. 

Dept. 113: Building Inspector Fiscal Year '91 

Account # Description FY90/91 

0305-01-113-5112 Bld.Insp. Salary, Appt. $38,083 

0306-01-113-5115 Bld.Insp. Perm. Wage, Clerk 9,700 

1162-01-113-5116 Bld.Insp. Perm. Pt.Time (Z.E.O.) 12,000 

1163-01-113-5121 Bld.Insp. Temp. Pt.Time Clerk 4,235 

Sub.Obj. 51: Sub Total 64,018 

0877-01-113-5311 Bld.Insp .Other Consl . (fill in) 1,000 

0308-01-113-5341 Bld.Insp. Telephone 225 

Sub.Obj. 53: Sub Total 1,225 

0309-01-113-5421 Bld.Insp. Office Supplies 800 

0310-01-113-5422 Bld.Insp. Printed Forms 1,000 

0934-01-113-5481 Bld.Insp. Oil & Lube 250 

Sub.Obj. 54: Sub Total 3,275 

0311-01-113-5711 Bld.Insp. Mileage 600 

1086-01-113-5721 Bld.Insp. Out/State Travel 375 
0953-01-113-5713 Bld.Insp.Othr .Chg./Exp(Land Use Courses) 1,000 

0312-01-113-5731 Bld.Insp .Assoc 'n Dues 300 

0313-01-113-5732 Bld.Insp.Publ . & Sub. 225 

0314-01-113-5733 Bld.Insp.Conf .Reg . 375 

Sub.Obj. 57: Sub Total 2,875 

0315-01-113-5858 Bld.Insp .Add ' 1 . Equip. (Cabs/Furniture ) 1,000 



Sub.Obj. 58: Sub Total 1,000 

0936-01-113-5411 Bld.Insp. Gasoline 360 



Sub.Obj. 54: Sub Total 360 

Department 113: Building Inspector Sub Total $72,753 
Dept. 063: Planning Board Fiscal Year '91 

0376-01-063-5112 Planning Bd. Salary- Apt. $37,551 



Sub.Obj. 51: Sub Total 37,551. 

The remainder of the Department 063 budget to be approved and funded through 
normal channels. 

Grand Total Department 113 and Department 063 (Planner Only): $110,304 

Income: a. General Fund $25,000 

b. Bid. Department Receipts $85,000 

c. Planning Board Receipts $15,000 

Total $125,000 

-20- 



The above grand total expenditure of $110,304, if funded from the General 
Fund would have placed the entire burden of that amount on the taxpayers of 
the Town. Through the adoption of MGL Chapter 44, Section 53E, the total tax 
burden is limited to a maximum of $25,000, leaving available a surplus of 
$74,000, free in Fiscal Year 91 and available to fund other needed budget 
items. ($84,000 + $15,000 collected 89/90 minus $25,000 expended July first 
1990). The 89/90 receipts are collected and available as free cash for 
FY91, and if Chapter 44, Section 53E is adopted as provided herein, that 
money will not be expended for either the Building Department or the Town 
Planner as, except for the first $25,000, that department and position will 
be funded by 90/91 receipts that would have normally been deposited in the 
General Fund and not made available for expenditure until FY92. 

E. Emergency expenditures normally processed through the Reserve Fund shall 
be approved through the normal channels, but such expenditures shall come 
from the Revolving Account if sufficient funds are available in total or in 
part. Should such funds not be available from the Revolving Account, then 
such expenditures shall be made from the General Reserve Fund of the Town. 

F. Any attempt to unfund the positions of Inspector of Buildings/Local 
Inspector/Zoning Enforcement Officer or Town Planner, or to by any other 
maneuver to cause these positions or position to be unstaffed, short of 
actual dismissal, by any Board, Committee, or the Town Manager, shall be 
prohibited except for an independent warrant article to be presented at any 
Annual or Special Town Meeting. (By petition) 

Mr. McNally moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

Motion was made to adjourn the Meeting until Tuesday, April 3, 1990, at 
7:30 p.m. Seconded. So voted. Meeting adjourned at 11:55 p.m. 

On Tuesday, April 3, 1990, the Meeting was called to order by the Moderator 
at 7:40 p.m. with 319 voters present. The final count was 487. 

Tellers appointed were Donald Curiale, Charles Dalton, Robert Sherman, Helen 
Bowen, James Di Fazio, and Barry Hopping. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, pursuant to the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 22C(m), as 
inserted by Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1989, (1) to raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for the FY91 Forestry Division, Highway Division sur- 
face treatment account, and Miscellaneous Finance Department budgets; and (2) 
to reduce the FY91 appropriations for Miscellaneous Finance Unemployment 
Compensation and Highway expenses; both said appropriations to be contingent 
upon the passage of a ballot referendum under the provisions of MGL Chapter 
59, Section 21C(g); or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate an addi- 
tional $192,094 for the FY91 Forestry Division, Highway Division and 
Miscellaneous Finance Department as follows: 



-21- 



Forestry 

Salaries $87,361 

Expenses 29,101 

Outlay 6,500 

Energy 3,378 
Highway 

Road Treatment 50,448 
Misc. Finance 

Health Insurance 5,506 

Workmen's Compensation 9,800 

$192,094; and 

(2) to reduce the appropriation in the FY91 Miscellaneous Finance 
Unemployment and Compensation budget by $22,014 and reduce the appropriation 
in the FY91 Highway Department Expenses budget by $35,000; both said 
appropriations (a net addition of $135,080) to be contingent upon the passage 
of a ballot referendum under the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 
21C(g). Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recom- 
mended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, pursuant to the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(m), as 
inserted by Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1989, (1) to raise and appropriate an 
additional sum of money for the FY91 Police, Fire, and Miscellaneous Finance 
Accounts to fund the salary and fringe benefits of one police officer and one 
firefighter; and (2) to reduce the appropriation in the FY91 Miscellaneous 
Finance Unemployment Compensation account; both said appropriations to be 
contingent upon the passage of a ballot referendum under the provisions of 
MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(g); or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate an additional 
$56,670 for the FY91 Police, Fire and Miscellaneous Finance Departments as 
follows: 

Pol ice 

Salaries $ 30,044 

Fire 

Salaries 24,176 

Misc. Finance 

Health & Life 2,450 

$ 56,670; and 

(2) to reduce the appropriation in the FY91 Miscellaneous Finance 
Unemployment Compensation budget by $16,080; both said appropriations (a net 
addition of $40,590) to be contingent upon the passage of a ballot referendum 
under the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(g). Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Police Chief Charles 
Surpitski, Acting Fire Chief Willard Maker urged acceptance. Motion carried 
on a unanimous voice vote. 

At this point, it was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's Charter, 
pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 
21C(m), as inserted by Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1989, to raise and 

-22- 



appropriate a sum of money for the purchase and installation of playground 
equipment including any materiel and/or services incidental thereto for FY91, 
said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referen- 
dum under the provisions of MGL , Chapter 59, Section 21C(i±); or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate an additional sum 
of $22,500 for the purpose of purchasing and installing playground equipment. 



Recreation Department 
Capital Outlay 



$22,500 



said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referen- 
dum under the provision of MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(i±). Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen 3-2 in favor, the park equipment is badly in need of 
replacement. Finance Committee, majority recommended. Recreation Director 
Elizabeth Dorman spoke of the many volunteers who have and are working and 
contributing to the playground renovation. Bialek Park, done last year, has 
been a great success. Motion carried on a voice vote. 



ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote, 
Charter, (1) to appropriate a 
to acquire any related materi 
and maintained bridges; (2) t 
accept, and expend any Federa 
the aforementioned purposes; 
acquire such easements and/or 
tuate said repairs, by purcha 
(4) to determine whether said 
transfer from available funds 
referendum if the Town will e 
Proposition 2\ the payment of 
said purposes under the provi 
take any other action relativ 



subject to the provisions of the Town's 
sum of money to engage engineering services and 
el and/or services for the repair of town-owned 

authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, 

1 and/or State grants which may be available for 
(3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 

other interest (s) as may be necessary to effec- 
se, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; 

appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, 
, or otherwise; and (5) to determine by ballot 
xempt from the levy limit provisions of 

principal and interest on the bonds issued for 
sions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(k); or to 
e thereto. 



Mr. Walton moved that the Town vote to place on the official ballot for the 
April 9, 1990 Elections the following question: 



"Shall the Town appropriate 
services and to acquire any 
of town-owned and maintained 
to apply for, accept, and ex 
available for the aforementi 
Selectmen to acquire such ea 
necessary to effectuate said 
domain, or otherwise; (4) to 
Treasurer, with the approval 
serial notes under the provi 
(5) shall the Town of Ipswic 
Proposition Two and One-half 
bond issue in order to repai 

Yes I I 



the sum of $217,000 (1) to engage engineering 
related materiel and/or services for the repair 
bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
tend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
oned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
sements and/or other interest (s) as may be 
repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
raise and appropriate by authorizing the 
of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or 
sions of the MGL Chapter 44, Section 7(4); and 
h be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the 
r Town-owned and maintained bridges?" 



No 



-23- 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended unanimously; Finance Committee sup- 
ported the article, which is a Debt Exclusion, and is to pay for much-needed 
repairs to the Green Street Bridge. It will require a two-thirds vote on the 
Ballot. Mrs. Conley said that the Historical Commission was in favor of the 
article; she spoke of Theodore Wendel's famous painting of the bridge. Mr. 
Engel said that the tax increase would only be for the three years of the 
debt. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, 
design, and construct extraordinary repairs to the Middle School and to 
obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal and/or State 
grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to deter- 
mine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from 
available funds, by ad valorem taxation, or otherwise; (4) to determine by 
ballot referendum if the Town will exempt from the levy limit provisions of 
Proposition 2s the payment of principal and interest on bonds issued for said 
purposes under the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(k); or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

School Committeeman David Pauley moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate 
the sum of $247,000 to survey, design, and construct extraordinary repairs to 
the Middle School and to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental 
thereto; (2) to authorize the board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and 
expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the afore- 
mentioned purposes; (3) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or 
serial notes under the provisions of MGL Chapter 44, Section 7 (3A); said 
appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of a ballot referendum 
question exempting from the levy limit provisions of Proposition Two and One- 
half the payment of principal and interest on bonds or notes issued for said 
purposes. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. A two-thirds vote was necessary; the motion carried on a unani- 
mous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of funds for classroom 
repairs and/or renovations to the Ipswich Middle School building; and repla- 
cement of worn or broken floor tiles; and purchase of physical education 
lockers and equipment for the Ipswich Middle School and to obtain any 
materiel and services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the 
School Committee to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State and pri- 
vate grants in conjunction with the aforesaid purposes; (3) to raise this 
appropriation by transferring funds from the stabilization fund for said 
purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate a sum of $65,000 for 
classroom repairs and/or renovations to the Ipswich Middle School building; 
and replacement of worn or broken floor tiles; and purchase of physical educa- 
tion lockers and equipment for the Ipswich Middle School and to obtain any 
materiel and services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the 
School Committee to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State, and pri- 
vate grants in conjunction with the aforesaid purposes; (3) to raise this 
appropriation by transferring $65,000 from the Stabilization Fund for said 
purposes. Seconded. Mr. Perna spoke of the bad conditions in the school. 

-24- 



The School Committee unanimously supported the article. There would be no 
impact on the tax rate. Mr. Engel said the Selectmen were 3-2 against the 
article. The Stabilization Fund should be used for emergency situations. 
The Finance Committee was 8-1 against the article. Mr. Swan felt that the 
school was in such bad shape that it would need a great deal more money than 
the article called for. Messrs. Seidler and Pauley spoke in favor of the 
article. The question was moved, seconded, so voted. The voice vote was 
inconclusive; on a hand count the question carried 313 for, 78 against. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money to purchase and install 
an air conditioning system or systems in the Ipswich Public Library, and to 
obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; and (2) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal and/or 
State grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; said 
appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referendum 
under the provisions of MGL , Chapter 59, Section 21C(ii); or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $65,000 to purchase and 
install an air conditioning system or systems in the Ipswich Public Library, 
and to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; and (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any Federal 
and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; 
said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referen- 
dum under the provisions of MGL Chapter 59, Section 21C(ii). Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Library 
Trustees Chairman Donald Greenough stated it would be an improvement of the 
existing capital asset. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, to raise and appropriate a sum of money to repaint the Town Hall and 
to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; (2) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal and/or 
State grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) 
to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, 
transfer from available funds, by ad valorem taxation, or otherwise; said 
appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referendum 
under the provisions of MGL, Chapter 59, Section 21C(i£); or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Wayne moved that the Town vote, subject to the provisions of the Town's 
Charter, to raise and appropriate the sum of $68,000 to repaint the Town Hall 
and to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; and (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes; said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override 
referendum under the provisions of MGL, Chapter 59, Section 21C(ii). 
Seconded. The Town Hall is an historic building; this money is for scraping, 
minor repairs, and painting. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommend. 
Finance Committee recommended with the provision that the situation be 
studied and the money spent wisely. Mrs. Conley was ambivalent about 
painting the building. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

-25- 



ARTICLE 29 

To hear and act on the reports of the Committees and to continue such 

Committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Mrs. Conley asked that the report of the Historic District Study Committee be 
accepted by the Committee not be continued; the Selectmen are in the process 
of appointing a new committee. Mr. Craft moved for continuation of the com- 
mittee. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

William Varrell asked that the report of the Commuter Rail Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Terri Stephens asked that the report of the Hall -Haskell House Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Kenneth Savoie asked that the report of the School Building Needs Committee be 
accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Fierro asked that the report of the Master Plan Commission be accepted 
and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 40 of 
Chapter 653 of the Acts of 1989 regarding assessment date changes for new 
growth; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 2A of 
Chapter 59 of the General Laws, as amended by Section 40 of Chapter 653 of 
the Acts of 1989 regarding assessment date changes for new growth. Seconded. 
This will allow the Town to tax, in the current fiscal year, all buildings 
built between January 1st and June 1st. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 41 of Chapter 
653 of the Acts of 1989 regarding quarterly tax bills; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town acting through its Board 
of Selectmen to execute a long-term lease of an approximate 60' x 60' parcel 
of land situate near the summit of Town Hill (Assessor's Map 31D, Parcel 21) 
generally in the form of "Lease Agreement between New York Cellular 
Geographic Service Area, Inc. and the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts", a copy 
of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town Moderator and is incor- 
porated herein by reference; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town acting through its 
Board of Selectmen to execute a long-term lease of an approximately 60' x 60' 
parcel of land situate near the summit of Town Hill (Assessor's Map 31D, 
Parcek 21) generally in the form of "Lease Agreement between New York 
Cellular Geographic Service Area, Inc., and the Town of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts", a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk, and with the 

-26- 



Town Moderator, and which is incorporated herein by reference. Seconded, 
this company wishes to put a 180' high tower on the top of Town Hill beside 
the water tank; the rental would be $14,400 yearly for seventeen years. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended 3-2; the Finance Committee recommended 7-2. 
After discussion, Ken Savoie (Planning Board) recommended an amendment: "I 
move to amend Article 32 by inserting the following words at the end of the 
motion as presented: said lease agreement shall not be executed until the 
Planning Board and Historical Commission have had the opportunity to review, 
approve and condition the proposed project as to its location, size, access, 
and general visual impact." Selectmen, Finance Committee supported the 
amendment. Town Counsel stated that main motion is on the lease, while the 
amendment is on the project. Mr. Savoie withdrew his amendment and proposed 
another: "I move to amend Article 32 by inserting the following words at the 
end of the motion as presented: Said lease agreement shall not be executed 
until the Planning Board and the Historical Commission have first reviewed 
and approved in writing the lease." Seconded. Amendment carried on a voice 
vote. Neighbors questioned the location and height of the tower; architect 
Paul McGinley spoke against it, saying that the tower would actually be 330' 
high (150' hill, 180' tower), it is right next to the cemetery. The question 
was moved, seconded, voted unanimously. The motion as amended failed on a 
majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 33 

To see whether the Town of Ipswich will vote to accept as a public way that 
portion of the layout of Colonial Drive as shown on a plan entitled "Bayview, 
Topsfield Road, Ipswich, Mass., Scale 1" = 40'. March 5, 1973, prepared by 
Raymond Engineering Service, Owned by Ipswich Bay Realty Trust", [Essex South 
Registry of Deeds Plan Book 127, Plan 17] from the Southeasterly boundary 
line of Lots 1 and 2 as shown on said plan to the terminus of cul-de-sac, at 
the Southerly end of Lot 6, intending to include the full length of said 
Colonial Drive except that portion directly abutting property owned by 
Ipswich Bay Realty Trust and designated Lots 1 and 2 on said plan. (By peti- 
tion) 

Mr. Fierro moved that the Town vote to accept as a public way that portion of 
Colonial Drive that abuts the three condominium complexes known as Bayside 
Village, The Terrace at Bayside, and River Ridge. Seconded. Mr. Fierro 
withdrew his motion and then presented the motion as posted: " move that the 
Town of Ipswich vote to accept as a public way that portion of the layout of 
Colonial Drive as shown on a plan entitled "Bayview, Topsfield Road, Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, Scale 1" = 40', March 5, 1973, prepared by Raymond Engineering 
Services, Owned by Ipswich Bay Realty Trust" (Essex South Registry of Deeds 
Plan Book 127, Plan 17), from the Southeasterly boundary line of lots 1 and 2 
as shown on said plan to the terminus of cul-de-sac, at the Southerly end of 
lot 6, intending to include the full length of said Colonial Drive except that 
portion directly abutting property owned by Ipswich Bay Realty Trust and 
designated lots 1 and 2 on said plan." Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Mr. Savoie said the Planning 
Board approved 3-1 on condition that a cash bond was posted to cover repairs 
necessary on the road; Mr. Ryan of Colonial Drive said that the bond would be 
posted prior to acceptance. Mr. Bingham felt that the article should be 
postponed until the October Meeting; Town plows would have to raise the plows 
going over the unaccepted part of the road to reach the accepted area. Mr. 
Ryan said the Town has always plowed the front part of Colonial Drive. Mr. 
Fierro moved to amend the motion by adding the following words at the end 
thereof: "...subject to the prior posting of a cash bond in an amount to be 
determined by the Planning Board." Seconded. Carried on voice vote. 
Question was moved, seconded, voted. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

-27- 



ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the following as Town streets which 
are contained in "Definitive Subdivision Plan, Appleton Estates, Ipswich, 
Massachusetts," Owner - Bush Hill Trust, 175 Andover Street, Danvers, MA; 
Engineer - T&M Engineering Associates, Inc., 22 Willow Avenue, Salem, MA; 
dated March 1, 1985 and revised to July 9, 1985; and consisting of twenty-two 
sheets [Essex South Registry of Deeds Plan Book 204, Plan 58]; and 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan Modification, Appleton Estates, Ipswich, 
Massachusetts," Owner/Developer - Bush Hill Trust, 175 Andover Street, 
Danvers, MA; Engineer - T&M Engineering Associates, Inc., 22 Willow Street, 
Salem, MA; dated March 3, 1986 and consisting of eight sheets [Essex South 
Registry of Deeds Plan Book 211, Plan 87]: Longmeadow Drive, Brentwood Way, 
Courtland Way, the entire "Proposed Fifty Feet Access and Utility Easement", 
and Intervale Way; or to take any other action relative therto. (By petition) 

Petitioner George Gray moved that the Town vote to accept the following as 
public ways which are contained in "Definitive Subdivision Plan, Appleton 
Estates, Ipswich, Massachusetts", Owner - Bush Hill Trust, 175 Andover 
Street, Danvers, MA; Engineer - T&M Engineering Associates, Inc., 22 Willow 
Avenue, Salem, MA; dated March 1, 1985, and revised to July 9, 1985; and con- 
sisting of twenty-two sheets (Essex South Registry of Deeds Plan Book 204, 
Plan 58); and "Definitive Subdivision Plan Modification, Appleton Estates, 
Ipswich, MA," Owner/Developer - Bush Hill Trust, 175 Andover Street, 
Danvers, MA; Engineer - T&M Engineering Associates, Inc., 22 Willow Street, 
Salem, MA; dated March 3, 1986, and consisting of eight sheets (Essex South 
Registry of Deeds Plan Book 211, Plan 87): Longmeadow Drive, Brentwood Way, 
Courtland Way, and Intervale Way. Seconded. Mr. Gray said the roads met all 
the conditions requested by the Planning Board. The Board of Selectmen una- 
nimously recommended. A majority of the Finance Committee recommended 
against; Condition #9 of the Subdivision approval specified that the deve- 
loper should deed a 50' right-of-way to the Town (the "Proposed Fifty Feet 
Access and Utility Easement" mentioned in the Warrant Article); this has not 
been done. After a long discussion, it was decided that the 50' right-of-way 
was an issue separate from the acceptance of the roads. The Planning Board 
recommended the motion 4-0. The question was moved, seconded, voted unani- 
mously. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 35 

To see if the town will vote to accept as a Town street Drumlin Road as shown 

on "Meadowview Farm Phase I Record Plan, C.T. Male Associates, P.C., 

Engineers and Planners, Two Central Street, Ipswich, MA 01938, February 12, 

1990" [Essex South Registry of Deeds Plan Book, Plan], consisting 

of three sheets, said plan being on file in the office of the Town Clerk; or 

to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Petitioner Jeffrey Simon moved that the Town vote to accept as a Town street 
Drumlin Road as shown on "Meadowview Farm Phase I Record Plan, C.T.Male 
Associates, P.C., Engineers and Planners, Two Central Street, Ipswich, MA, 
February 12, 1990", recorded at Essex South Registry of Deeds, consisting 
of three- sheets, said plan being on file in the office of the Town Clerk, and 
incorporated herein by reference. Seconded. The road was approved by the 
Inspector, and the Planning Board released the bond. Board of Selectmen, 
Planning Board unanimously recommended, Finance Committee recommended 8-1 
abstention. Unanimous voice vote. 



-28- 



ARTICLE 36 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the 

Town of Ipswich as follows: 

"SECTION VIII. SIGNS A. Sign Limitations ." by adding the following sub- 
sections thereto: 

"7. Flags or banners. 1 (one) flag or banner (per business) no larger 
than 10 (ten) square feet shall be allowed to display a product or 
service, or as an indication of the establishment being "Open" for 
business. Flags shall only be displayed during the hours of 
operation of the business. Flags or banners over a public walkway 
shall be a minimum of 80 inches above grade."; and 

"B. Sign Requirements . 
2. Other districts, 
b." by adding a new subsection thereto: 

"(vii) State Highway district: within the boundaries of the state 
highway layout, the following parameters shall apply: 

Standing signs for a single use shall not exceed 20 (twenty) 
square feet, or 50 (fifty) square feet for multiple uses. 

The bottom of the sign shall be at least 6 (six) feet above 
grade, and the top of the sign shall be no more than 20 (twenty) 
feet above grade at the base. 

The standing sign shall be located at least 8 feet from the 
pavement line, but in any case at least 2 (two) feet from the 
lot 1 ine. " (By petition) 

Mr. Engel moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 37 

To see if the voters of Ipswich shall, subject to the provisions of Chapter 
620, Acts of 1966, appropriate and allocate the sum of five thousand ($5,000) 
dollars for the purpose of supporting, sponsoring, and meeting incurred 
expenses for the annual Jimmy Day Parade, to be held in the Town of Ipswich, 
on September 30, 1990. (By petition) 

Mr. George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 38 

To see if the Town will, subject to the provisions of the Town's Charter, 
vote to request our legislative delegation to file Special, Home Rule, 
Legislation as follows: 

To suspend any and all rules and regulations, of the Environmental 
Protection Agency, pertaining to Sanitary Land Fills and allow the Town of 
Ipswich to establish an emergency Sanitary Land Fill, on land owned by the 
Town of Ipswich, at the end of Town Farm Road known as the Poor Farm Land. 
Said Land Fill to be governed by rules and regulations set forth by the 
Ipswich Board of Selectmen for the use of Ipswich residents and businesses 
doing business within the boundaries of the Town of Ipswich. No toxic 



-29- 



materials will be dumped at said Land Fill. Emergency operation of the Land 
Fill to cease, be covered and seeded, at such time that the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts or some other private business or governing body makes 
available the technology, at a cost that will not bankrupt the Town of 
Ipswich, to deal with the ever mounting trash problem. This act shall take 
effect upon its passage. (By petition) 

Mr. Engel moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 39 

To see if the Town will vote to request the Town's legislative delegation to 
file special Home Rule Legislation on behalf of injured Police Officers and 
Firemen and other Ipswich Town Employees who are forced, or have been forced, 
to retire because of job related injuries or illnesses and provide the finan- 
cial information, to the voters, at said Town Meeting. 

Legislative Act to read as follows: An act directing the Essex County 

Retirement Board to grant certain pensions to George Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, 

Clifton Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, George Hulbert, and future disabled 
Ipswich Police Officers and Firemen. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court 
assembled, and by authority of the same, as follows: 

Article 1 
Seel Not withstanding the provisions of any law to the contrary and in 
order to promote the public good, the Retirement Board of Essex County is 
hereby authorized and directed to increase the pensions payable to George 
Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, Clifton Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, George 
Hulbert, retired Police Officers and Firemen of the Town of Ipswich, who as 
a result of injuries sustained by them while in the performance of their 
duties as Police Officers and Firemen are totally and permanently incapaci- 
tated for further service as Police Officers and Firemen. 

The annual amount of pensions payable said George Stevenson, Joseph 
Carpenter, Clifton Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, and George Hulbert under the 
provisions of this act shall be fixed in the amount equal to the regular rate 
of compensation which they would have paid had they continued in the service 
as police officers and firemen of said Town, at the grade held by them at the 
time of their retirement. The annual pension payable to said George 
Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, Clifton Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, and George 
Hulbert under provisions of this act shall be reduced by the amount of any 
compensation they may receive from any gainful employment after the effective 
date of this act. 

Sec. 2 The Commonwealth shall reimburse the Essex County Retirement Board for 
the cost of living payments of George Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, Clifton 
Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, and George Hulbert which would have been paid 
had this act not been passed. 

Sec. 3 Upon the death of George Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, Clifton 
Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, and George Hulbert if they die as a natural and 
proximate result of the injuries sustained or hazard undergone which resulted 
in their retirement, leaving their wives surviving them, the Essex County 



-30- 



Retirement Board shall pay them, so long as they remain unmarried, a pension 
in the amount of seventy-two percent of the amount of pensions payable to 
said George Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, Clifton Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, 
and George Hulbert at the time of their deaths, plus a cost of living 
allowance pursuant to the terms and conditions of Section One Hundred and Two 
of Chapter Thirty-two of the General Laws. Upon the death or remarriage of 
the survivor wives of said George Stevenson, Joseph Carpenter, Clifton 
Wentworth, Maynard Boutchie, and George Hulbert all pension allowances shall 
end . 

Sec. 4 This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Article 2 
Seel Not withstanding the provisions of any law to the contrary and in 
order to promote the public good, the Retirement Board of Essex County is 
also hereby authorized and directed to increase the pensions payable to all 
retired, disabled, and future disabled Ipswich Town Employees, who as a 
result of injuries sustained by them while in the performance of their duties 
as Employees of the Town of Ipswich are permanently incapacitated for further 
service as an employee of said town. The annual amount of pension payable 
said retirees under the provisions of this act shall be fixed in the amount 
equal to the regular rate of compensation which would have been paid had they 
continued in service as Employees of the Town of Ipswich, at the grade held 
by them at the time of their retirement. The annual pension payable to said 
Town Employees under the provisions of this act shall be reduced by the 
amount of any compensation they may receive from any gainful employment, 
private insurance or Workmans Compensation after the effective date of this 
act. 

Sec. 2 The Commonwealth shall reimburse the Essex County Retirement Board for 
the cost of living payments to said disabled Town Employees which would have 
been paid had this act not been passed. 

Sec. 3 Upon the death of said Town Employees if they die as a natural and 
proximate result of the injuries sustained or hazard undergone which resulted 
in their retirement, leaving their spouse surviving them, the Essex County 
Retirement Board shall pay them, so long as they remain unmarried, a pension 
in the amount of seventy-two percent of the amount of pensions payable said 
Town Employee at the time of their deaths, plus a cost of living allowance 
pursuant to the terms and conditions of Section One Hundred and Two of 
Chapter Thirty-Two of the General Laws. Upon the death or remarriage of the 
survivor spouse of said Town Employee, all pension allowance shall end. 

Sec. 4 This act shall take effect upon its passage. ; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Petitioner Clifton Wentworth moved that the Town vote to request the Town's 
legislative delegation to file special Home Rule Legislation on behalf of 
injured Police Officers and Firemen and other Ipswich Town Employees who are 
forced, or have been forced, to retire because of job-related injuries or 
illnesses as presented in the Warrant under Article 39 of the April 2, 1990 
Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 against; Mr. Engel 
said it would cost the Town $120,000 and add $23.20 to the tax rate. Finance 
Committee unanimously against. The question was moved, seconded, voted. 
Motion failed on a voice vote. 

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ARTICLE 40 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 

Ipswich by adopting the following new Wetlands Protection By-Law, viz: 

"CHAPTER XVIII - IPSWICH WETLANDS PROTECTION BY-LAW 

SECTION 1: PURPOSE 

The purpose of this By-Law is to protect the wetlands, flood plains, water 

resources, and adjoining land areas in the Town of Ipswich by prior review 

and control of activities deemed by the Conservation Commission ("the 

Commission") likely to have a significant or cumulative effect on wetland 

values, including but not limited to the following: 

Public or private water supply 

Groundwater or surface water 

Flood control 

Erosion or sedimentation control 

Storm damage prevention 

Water qual ity 

Water pollution prevention 

Fisheries 

Land Containing Shellfish 

Wildlife habitat 
(collectively, the "interest protected by this By-law"). 

SECTION 2: JURISDICTION 

Except as permitted by the Conservation Commission or as provided in this 
By-Law, no person shall remove soil or vegetation from, fill, dredge, build 
upon, discharge into, or alter the following Resource Areas: 

Coastal wetlands, 

Freshwater wetlands, 

Bank, beach, dune, marsh, meadow, swamp, or flat bordering on 

a water body; 
or land within 100 feet of these resource areas; 
or land under a water body; 

or land subject to flooding, tidal action or coastal storm flowage; 
or vernal pools within a wetland resource area; 
or land within 150 feet of the Parker River/Essex Bay Area of 
Critical Environmental Concern. 

Any activity proposed or undertaken outside the above areas is not subject to 
regulation under this By-Law and does not require the filing of a permit 
application unless and until that activity actually alters any of the said 
resource areas. 

In the event that the Commission determines that such activity has in fact 
altered a Resource Area as identified in this By-Law, it shall impose such 
conditions on the activity or any portion thereof as it deems necessary to 
contribute to the protection of the interests identified in this By-Law. 

SECTION 3: DEFINITIONS, EXEMPTIONS, TIME FRAMES, REQUIREMENTS, AND 
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS 

Except as otherwise provided in this By-Law or regulations of the Commission, 
the definitions of terms, exemptions, limited projects, performance stan- 
dards, time frames, and requirements in this By-Law shall be as set forth in 



-32- 



the Wetlands Protection Act, MGL Chapter 131, Section 40, and in 310 CMR 
10.00 ("the State regulations") as may be amended from time to time. 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and implemen- 
tation of this By-Law: 

The term "Fresh Water Wetland" shall include any marsh, bog, swamp or 
wet meadow, whether or not it borders on a water body. Said wetland 
may be defined by its vegetational community, soil composition or 
hydrologic regime. A wetland not bordering on a body of water and 
not exceeding 5000 square feet shall not be subject to protection 
under this By-Law. 

The term "water body" shall mean any creek, ocean or land subject to 
tidal action, lake, pond, river, estuary, or stream, whether inter- 
mittent or not, man-made or natural. 

The term "Land Subject to Flooding" shall mean all land subject to inun- 
dation by ground or surface water, including land within the 100 year 
floodplain, isolated land subject to flooding, and bordering land 
subject to flooding as defined in the State regulations. 

The term "Flood Plain" shall mean Bordering land subject to flooding as 
defined by 310 CMR 10.57 (2) (a) as may be amended from time to time. 

The term "Parker River/Essex Bay Area of Critical Environmental 
Concern" shall include that portion of the state-approved Parker 
River/Essex Bay ACEC identified in the publication entitled Coastal 
Areas of Critical Concern prepared by the Massachusetts Coastal Zone 
Management office, revised August 1989, and as further shown on a map 
entitled Parker River/Essex Bay, Area of Critical Environmental 
Concern, scale 1" = 1/4 mile, prepared by the Office of Coastal Zone 
Management as an enlarged composite of four maps from the United 
States Geological Service. 

The term "vernal pool" shall mean any vernal pool certified by the 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife in accordance with 
310 CMR 10.57. 

The term "alter" shall mean to change the condition of any area sub- 
ject to protection under this By-Law. Examples of alterations 
include, but are not limited to the following: 

a) Removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand, gravel, or aggre- 
gate materials of any kind; 

b) Changing of pre-existing drainage characteristics, flushing 
characteristics, sedimentation patterns, flow patterns, or flood 
retention characteristics; 

c) Drainage or other disturbances of water level or water table; 

d) Dumping, discharging or filling with any material which may 
degrade water quality; 



-33- 



e) Placing of fill, or removal of material, which would alter eleva- 
tion; 

f) Driving of piles, erection or repair of buildings, or structures 
of any kind; 

g) Placing of obstructions or other dam-like structures in water; 

h) Destruction of plant life including cutting of more than five 
mature trees; 

i) Changing water temperature, biochemical oxygen demand, or other 
physical or chemical characteristics of water; 

j) Any activities, changes or work which may cause or tend to 

contribute to pollution of any resource area under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Commission; 

k) Application of pesticides and/or herbicides. 

SECTION 4: FILING PROCEDURE 

A permit application ("Application" or "Notice"), which may be identical in 
form to a Notice of Intent as required pursuant to MGL Chapter 131 Section 
40, shall, at a minimum, have the same content as that required by "Notice of 
Intent." The application shall include such plans as may be necessary to 
describe the boundaries of wetland resource areas, the proposed activity, and 
its effects and potential impacts upon the ability of the resource area to 
protect the interests identified in this By-Law. No work shall begin until 
the permit, which may be the same as the Order of Conditions issued under 
MGL. Chapter 131 Section 40, has been issued, all appeal periods have 
expired, and said permit has been recorded with the Registry of Deeds or Land 
Court, in accordance with Section 18 of this By-Law. 

The application shall be sent by certified mail, return receipt, 
or hand delivered to the Ipswich Conservation Commission at the 
Town Hall, or in its absence to the Town Clerk. No such applica- 
tion shall be sent before all permits, variances, and approvals, 
except a building permit, required by local By-Law with respect to 
the proposed activity have been obtained except that such notice 
may be filed, at the option of the applicant, after the filing of 
an application or applications for said permit, variances, and 
approvals; provided, that such notice shall include any infor- 
mation submitted in connection with such permits, variances, and 
approvals which is necessary to describe the effect of the pro- 
posed activity on the interests protected by this By-Law. 

The Commission may assess the Applicant for reasonable costs expended in the 
review of the Application by independent technical experts not to exceed 
$1,000. This authority may be further detailed in regulations adopted under 
this By-Law. The Commission may waive the fees, costs, and expenses for an 
application or request filed by a government agency. 

SECTION 5: ENTRY UPON PRIVATE PROPERTY; ENFORCEMENT 

The Commission, its agents, officers and employees may enter upon privately 

owned land to perform their duties under this By-Law and make or cause to be 

made such examinations, surveys or samplings as the Commission deems 

necessary. 

-34- 



SECTION 6: REQUEST TO DETERMINE IF BY-LAW APPLIES 

An applicant may submit a written request to the Commission for a deter- 
mination of the applicability of this By-Law to any land or work thereon. 
Upon receipt of said request, the Commission shall, within twenty-one (21) 
calendar days, make a written determination as to whether this By-Law is 
applicable to land or work as described by plans submitted with the request, 
unless an extension is authorized in writing by the applicant. 

SECTION 7: HEARING 

When an application for a permit as provided in Section (4) has been sub- 
mitted to the Commission, a public hearing on said application shall be sche- 
duled by the Commission within twenty-one (21) calendar days of the date of 
submission as determined by the date of receipt, unless an extension is 
requested or authorized in writing by the applicant. Notice of the time and 
place of such hearing and of the subject matter, sufficient for the iden- 
tification, shall be given by the Commission (at the expense of the appli- 
cant) by advertisement in a newspaper of general circulation in Ipswich at 
least five (5) business days prior to the date of such hearing. 

SECTION 8: BURDEN OF PROOF 

The applicant shall have the burden of proving by a preponderance of the cre- 
dible evidence that the work proposed in the application will not adversely 
affect the interests protected by this By-Law. The Commission may, if a 
majority of its members deem it necessary in order to make a decision before 
issuing a permit, require that the applicant provide an engineering, hydro- 
geological, botanical, or other study. No engineering, hydrogeological , bota- 
nical, or other study shall commence until such time as the applicant has 
agreed, in writing, to the specified study. The costs of such studies are to 
be borne by the applicant. Selection of a consultant to perform a required 
study shall be subject to the approval of the Commission. Said approval 
shall be based on the experience, qualifications and credentials of the con- 
sultant and shall not be unreasonably withheld. 

Failure to provide adequate evidence to the Commission supporting a deter- 
mination that the proposed work will not adversely affect the interests pro- 
tected by this By-Law shall be sufficient cause for the Commission to deny a 
permit, or to grant a permit with conditions, or in the Commission's discretion 
to continue the hearing to another date to enable the applicant or others to 
present additional evidence. The Commission and the applicant may also 
mutually agree to continue the hearing. 

SECTION 9: PERMIT AND CONDITIONS 

The Commission shall issue a permit to the applicant or, if in the opinion of 
the Commission the proposed work described in the application may adversely 
affect the interests protected by this By-Law, deny such permit within 
twenty-one (21) calendar days after the conclusion of the public hearing or 
such further time as may be agreed upon at the written request of the appli- 
cant. The Commission shall set forth in what manner the interests of this 
By-Law are affected in the permit or denial. The Commission may impose such 
conditions as it determines are reasonable to protect those interests. All 
work shall conform to the conditions set forth in the permit. 

In the event of a denial of an application, the Commission shall set forth in 
detail the reasons for the denial. The Commission shall then file its deci- 
sion with the Town Clerk, a copy of which shall be recorded in a book kept 

-35- 



for the purpose, and shall send notice of such action to the applicant by 
certified mail, return receipt requested, to the address stated on the applica- 
tion. 

Permits shall expire three years from the date of issuance. An applicant may 
apply for an extension before thirty (30) calendar days prior to the 
expiration of the permit or extension and the Commission may grant extensions 
for one or more periods of up to three years each. Notice of any extensions 
of time granted an applicant shall be filed with the Town Clerk. 

SECTION 10: AMENDMENTS TO PERMITS 

The conditions contained in the permit issued under the provisions of SECTION 

9 may be amended by the Commission with the consent of the applicant. 

Amendments that may be approved by the Commission shall be limited to the 

following: 

1. Amendments by deletion provided that such deletions do not dero- 
gate the intent and purpose of the permit conditions. 

2. Perfecting amendments, inclusive of, but not limited to, the 
correction of typographical errors, and errors of reference. 

3. Amendments that alter the scope but not the intent of the par- 
ticular condition being amended. 

4. Other Amendments approved following notice and a public hearing. 

The Commission shall not approve any amendments to conditions contained in 
permits for work that has been completed in accordance with the provisions 
contained in the original permit. 

For good cause, the Commission may revoke or modify a permit issued under 
this By-Law, after notice to the holder of the permit, notice to the public, 
and a public hearing. 

SECTION 11: APPEALS 

Any aggrieved party may appeal the action or inaction of the Commission. 

Appeals may be taken as provided by MGL Chapter 249 Section 4 as may be amended 

SECTION 12: EMERGENCY PROJECTS 

The notice provisions of this By-Law shall not apply to emergency projects 
initiated by the Town of Ipswich or other governmental Boards, Agencies, or 
Commissions necessary for the immediate protection of public health, safety 
and welfare of the citizens of Ipswich. However, the Commission shall be 
notified within 24 hours of the commencement of such projects. In the 
absence of members of the Commission, notification may be made to the Board 
of Selectmen, Town Manager, or Board of Health. A certificate of emergency 
condition shall be filed with the Commission by the Board, Town Manager, 
Agency, or Commission which authorized the project, within fourteen (14) days 
after the initiation of work, and a copy thereof shall be recorded by the 
Town Clerk. 

SECTION 13: PRE-ACQUISITION VIOLATION 

Any person who purchases, inherits, or otherwise acquires real estate upon 

which work has been done in violation of the provisions of this By-Law or in 

-36- 



violation of any order issued pursuant to this By-Law, shall forthwith comply 
with an order to restore such real estate to its condition prior to any such 
violations or to comply with conditions determined by the Commission if 
restoration is impractical. No action by the Town of Ipswich, civil or cri- 
minal, shall be brought against such person unless commenced within three 
years of the acquisition of the real estate. 

SECTION 14: RULES AND REGULATIONS 

After due notice and public hearing, the Commission may promulgate regu- 
lations and procedures for compliance with this By-Law, a copy of which shall 
be filed with the Town Clerk. Failure by the Commission to promulgate such 
procedures or a legal declaration of their invalidity by a court of law shall 
not act to suspend or invalidate the effects of this By-Law. 

SECTION 15: SEVERABILITY 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this By-Law shall not invali- 
date any other section, nor shall it invalidate any permit or determination 
which previously had been issued. 

SECTION 16: SECURITY 

As part of a permit issued under this By-Law, in addition to any security 
required by any other municipal or state board, agency or official, the 
Commission may require that the performance and observance of the conditions 
imposed hereunder be secured wholly or in part by one or more of the methods 
described below and which have been approved by Town Counsel: 

a) By a proper bond or deposit of money or negotiable securities or 
other undertaking of financial responsibility sufficient in the 
reasonable judgment of the Commission; 

b) By a conservation restriction, easement or other covenant enfor- 
ceable in a court of law, executed and duly recorded by the owner of 
record, running with the land to the benefit of this municipality or 
its inhabitants whereby the permit conditions shall be performed and 
observed before any lot may be conveyed other than by mortgage. 

SECTION 17: ENFORCEMENT 

The Commission shall have authority to enforce this By-Law, its regulations, 
and permits issued thereunder by violation notices, enforcement orders, and 
civil or criminal court actions. 

Upon request of the Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the Town Counsel 
may take legal action for enforcement under civil law. Upon request of the 
Commission, the chief of police shall take legal action for enforcement under 
criminal law. 

In addition to the duties previously set forth in this By-Law, the 
Commission, its agents, officers and employees, and any officer with police 
powers may issue enforcement orders directing compliance with this By-Law 
and may undertake any other enforcement action authorized by law. 
Enforcement Orders shall be recorded in the Registry of Deeds unless other- 
wise voted by the Commission. The Commission is authorized to record 
Enforcement Orders issued or ratified by a majority of the Commission. Any 
person who violates the provisions of this By-Law may be ordered to restore 
property to its original condition and take other actions deemed necessary 
to remedy such violations. 



-37- 



No person shall remove, fill, dredge or alter any area subject to protection 
under this By-Law without the required authorization, or cause, suffer, or 
allow such activity or leave in place unauthorized fill, or otherwise fail to 
restore illegally altered land to its original condition, or fail to comply 
with an enforcement order issued pursuant to this By-Law. Each day such 
violation continues shall constitute a separate offense except that any per- 
son who fails to remove unauthorized fill or otherwise fails to restore ille- 
gally altered land to its original condition after giving written 
notification of said violation to the Conservation Commission and the 
Department of Environmental Protection (the "Department") shall not be sub- 
ject to additional penalties unless said person thereafter fails to comply 
with an enforcement order or order of conditions. 

a. Criminal Complaint 

Whoever violates any provision of the Ipswich Wetlands Protection 
By-Law, regulations thereunder or permits issued thereunder may be subject 
to indictment or complaint brought in District Court. Except as may other- 
wise be provided by law, and as the District Court may see fit to impose, 
the maximum penalty for any violation of these provisions shall be $300.00 
for each offense. Each day on which any violation exists shall be deemed to 
be a separate offense. 

b. Non-Criminal Disposition 

In addition to the procedure set forth in (a), the provisions of the 
Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law may also be enforced by the Conservation 
Administrator or by a police officer of the Town, by a non-criminal complaint 
pursuant to the provisions of G.L. c.40, Section 21D. Each day on which any 
violation continues to exist shall be deemed to be a separate offense. 

The penalties for violation of any provision of the Ipswich Wetlands 
Protection By-Law shall be as follows: 

Non-Compl iance 
Wetlands With an Order 
Buffer Resource Of Conditions or 
Zone Area Enforcement Order 

1st Offense $25.00 $50.00 $75.00 

2nd Offense $50.00 $150.00 $200.00 

3rd Offense $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 

and any 

subsequent 

SECTION 18: RECORDING OF PERMITS AND ADJUSTMENTS THERETO 

Prior to the commencement of work subject to any permit issued under the pro- 
vision of SECTION 9 and any amendment thereof approved under the pro- 
visions of SECTION 10, the permits and amendments thereto shall be 
recorded with the Essex County Registry of Deeds, or in the event that the 
permit has been issued for work on registered land, with the Land Court of 
the Commonwealth. A copy of the recorded permit shall be submitted to the 
Commission within twenty-one days of such recording. 



-38- 



SECTION 19: EFFECTIVE DATE 

This By-Law shall not apply to those projects and activities for which a 
Notice of Intent has been filed on or before August 15, 1990, and for which 
a Final Order of Conditions is ultimately issued by the Commission or the 
Department of Environmental Protection and to those projects for which an 
Order of Conditions is issued approving the project on or before September 1, 
1990. The By-Law shall apply to all other projects and activities." 
(By petition) 

Richard Nylen of the Conservation Commission moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich by adopting the Wetlands 
Protection By-Law as presented in Article 40 of the Warrant for the April 2, 
1990 Annual Town Meeting, with the exception of the third paragraph of 
" SECTION 17: ENFORCEMENT ", which shall read as follows: 

"In addition to the duties previously set forth in the By-Law, the 
Commission, its agents, officers and employees, and any officer with 
police powers may issue enforcement orders directing compliance with 
this By-Law and may undertake any other enforcement action authorized 
by law. Enforcement orders issued or ratified by a majority of the 
Commission may be recorded in the Registry of Deeds if voted by the 
Commission. Any person who violates the provisions of this By-Law 
may be ordered to restore property to its original condition and take 
other actions deemed necessary to remedy such violations."; 

and by adding the following sentence at the end of SECTION 19: 

"This By-Law shall not apply to those projects or activities which 
are exempt from the provisions of the Wetlands Protection Act, 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 131, Section 40, as amended, and 
310 CMR 10.00, as amended." 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen in favor; Finance Committee, Planning Board 
unanimously recommended. Roger Barous complained that this would give the 
Commission police powers; David Warner asked if a warrant would be necessary 
to go on private property; Mr. Nylen said it would be; also, people would be 
notified by registered mail and would have right of appeal. Question was 
moved, seconded, carried on a voice vote. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 41 

To see if the Town will vote to repeal Section IX. B of the Ipswich 
Protective Zoning By-Law otherwise known as the Wetlands District Zoning 
By-Law. (By petition) 

Mr. Nylen moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich by repealing Section IX. B thereof in its entirety, com- 
monly known as the Wetlands District Zoning By-Law. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board, Conservation Commission all 
recommended unanimously. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 42 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
convey a roadway and utility easement to Oak Hill, Inc., for a minimum 
purchase price to be established by Town Meeting, across land of the Town of 
Ipswich ("The Memorial Building" - Assessor's Map 42A, Parcel 261); or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

-39- 



Mr. Engel moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 43 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be 

placed in the stabilization fund; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 44 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all money articles con- 
tained in this warrant for the purpose of completing a budget which is 
balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2i, 
so called; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to reconsider its action under ARticle 18 
of the April 2, 1990 Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 
against 3-2. Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. Mr. Engel moved that Article 18 be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded, and voted to adjourn the Annual Town Meeting at 
11:23 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by 
publication at least seven days prior to the time for holding said meeting in 
a newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of 
Ipswich . 

Given unto our hands this 19th day of March in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
William E. George 
Robert H. Leet 
Charles 3. Wayne 
William I. Walton 



-40- 



1990 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 

affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE 

TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF OCTOBER, 1990, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and 

there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:47 p.m. with 211 

votors present. The final count was 323 at 9:00 p.m. Superintendent of 

Schools Richard Thompson led the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. It was 

moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. 

Moderator James Grimes introduced new Finance Committee members Jamie Fay and 
Leonard Heurlin, new Selectman Patrick McNally, and new Town Clerk Fran 
Richards . 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from free cash and/or 
from available funds to pay unpaid bills in the School, Water, and/or 
Municipal budgets incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the town appropriate and transfer from 
free cash the sum of $15,028.77 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years 
and remaining unpaid: 

Veteran's Benefits 

Caldwell Nursing Home $14,653.08 
Pol ice 

Paul 's Auto 280.00 

Elections 

Catherine McElhinney 73.50 

School s 

Marie Harrington 22.19 

Total $15,028.77 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to amend "The Protective Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Ipswich," as follows: 

1. Amend SECTION IV. A. Type of Districts , by deleting the words "nine (9)" 
and substituting the words "twelve (12)"; and amend SECTION IV. A. 
further by adding a new district, "Rural Residential C (RRC) District," 
following the existing "Rural Residence B (RRB) District"; a new 
"Planned Commercial District (PC)" after the existing "Business (B) 
District"; and adding a new "Limited Industrial (LI) District" after the 
existing "Industrial (I) District," and renumbering the resulting list 
of districts "1" through "12". 



•41- 



2. Amend SECTION IV B. Intent of Districts as follows: 

a. Following section 3, add: "4. The Planned Commercial District is 
intended for non-residential uses. Office and service uses are per- 
mitted; retail, research and development, warehouse and other com- 
mercial uses require a special permit. Enclosed manufacturing is 
prohibited. The district is intended to preserve the natural 
features and vistas of the Route One Corridor. The district is not 
served by municipal sewerage or water." 

b. Following the existing section 4, add: "6. The Limited Industrial 
District is intended for some light industrial, wholesale, and ware- 
house uses. Industrial uses which require smelting or chemical 
reduction or which might constitute a nuisance due to odor, fumes, 
dust, vibration, heat, glare, noise, (i.e., have a decibel level 
over fifty-five more than fifty feet from the premises), or other 
nuisance characteristic, are not intended. Retail and office uses 
are prohibited. The district is intended to preserve the natural 
features of vistas of the Route One Corridor. The district is not 
served by municipal sewerage. Municipal water supply is available 
only in that portion of the district bordering Old Right Road and 
the access road to Assessor's Map 27A, Parcel 21." 

Further amend this section by renumbering the new list of sections "1" 
through "9". 

3. Amend SECTION V. D. Table of Use Regulations by adding three new column 
headings, "RRC", following the heading "RRB"; "PC" following the heading 
"B"; and "LI" following the heading "I"; by modifying the description of 
some uses; and by indicating the permitted uses for these districts in 
the new columns, as follows: 

TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 16 



RRC PC LI 



RESIDENTIAL 

Single-family detached dwelling P - - 

Two-family dwelling SBA 

Multi -family dwelling - 

Tourist home - 

Dormitory, resident fraternity or sorority - 

Mobile home for permanent residency - 

Mobile home for temporary residency (9/15/86) SBA SBA 1 SBA 1 

Open Space Preservation Zoning (4/1/85) SPB 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

Church and other religious purpose P P P 

Educational purpose which is religious, 

sectarian, denominational, public, or 

non-profit P P P 
Educational purpose which is operated 

for profit, except nursery school - SBA SBA 

Private day nursery SBA? 

Membership club SBA SBA SBA 
Town governmental building except equip- 
ment garage SBA P P 

-42- 



PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



16 



RRC PC LI 



P 3 S P B 3 SPB 3 



Town equipment garage - SBA SBA 

Expansion of existing town or non-profit 
cemetery, including any crematory therein SBA SBA SBA 

Town outdoor recreation facility and any 
other outdoor non-commercial recreation 
use such as private boathouses and land- 
ings 

Historical, philanthropic, or charitable 
association or society P P P 

Power plant, refuse incineration and 
sanitary landfill, or wastewater treat- 
ment facility for Municipal use only SPB SPB SPB 
(Amended 4/6/87) 

Municipal parking lot or structure - SPB P 

Street, bridge, vehicular tunnel, or 
railroad lines P P P 

Facilities as needed for essential com- 
munity services P P P 

Private utility overhead transmission 
line, substation or similar facility or 
building - 

AGRICULTURE AND OPEN SPACE 

Gardens, orchards, nurseries, and silvi- 
culture P P P 

Piggeries and mink farms - 

Greenhouses and farms including the rais- 
ing, keeping, slaughter, and dressing of 
livestock or other farm animals 

on five (5) acres or more P P P 

on less than five (5) acres - SBA SBA 

Sale of farm, horticulture, and nursery 
products, on a wholesale or retail basis SBA 4 SBA 4 SBA 4 

The following uses, if commercial: Kennel, 
stable, livery stable, riding academy, or 
veterinary hospital SBA 5 SBA 5 SBA 5 

COMMERCIAL 

Retail establishment selling principally 
convenience goods including but not lim- 
ited to: food, drugs, and proprietary 
goods - SBA 14 - 

Retail establishment selling general mer- 
chandise, including but not limited to 
dry goods, apparel and accessories, fur- 
niture and home furnishings, home equip- 
ment, small wares, and hardware, and 
including discount and limited price 
variety stores - P - 

Eating and drinking places where consump- 
tion is intended primarily to be within 
the building - SBA 14 - 



-43- 



PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



16 



RRC PC LI 



- 


SPB 14 


- 


- 


SPB 


- 


SBA 


- 


- 


- 


SBA 


- 


SBA 7 






- 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


- 



Establishment selling and/or renting new 
and/or used automobiles, trucks, air- 
craft, boats, motorcycles, and household 
and camping trailers, and enclosed repair 
facilities accessory thereto 

Establishment selling motor vehicle parts 
and accessories - SBA^ 

Motor vehicle repair and/or motor vehicle 
service station (not including a junkyard 
or open storage of abandoned motor 
vehicles ) 

Hotels and Motels 

Conversion of an existing dwelling into 
an inn 

Personal and consumer service establish- 
ment 

Funeral establishment 

Rest homes, convalescent home, or nursing 
homes for the elderly or infirm 

Hospital, or medical or dental clinic 

Membership club 

Miscellaneous professional and business 
offices and services including, but not 
limited to, medical, legal, or other pro- 
fessional services and finance, banking, 
insurance and real estate offices 

Miscellaneous business repair services 

Motion picture establishment, indoor only 

Other amusement and recreation service, 
indoor only 

Country, fishing, tennis, boating, golf- 
ing, or similar club 

Commercial parking lot or structure in- 
cluding a public garage 

WHOLESALE, TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL 

Removal of sand, gravel, or loam - 

Newspaper printing and job printing - 

Processing and treating of raw materials 
not enclosed, including operations ap- 
purtenant to the removal, such as grad- 
ing, drying, sorting, crushing, grinding, 
and milling operations - 

Research offices or establishments devoted 
to research and development activities - SBA SBA 

Enclosed manufacturing or processing - - P 

Enclosed construction uses including 
materials and equipment storage and 
supplies - SBA P 

Bakery, laundry, or dry cleaning plant - 

Bus and railroad passenger station and 
other transportation service - SPB 



-44- 



- 


P 


- 


- 


SBA 14 


SBA 


- 


SBA 


- 


- 


SBA 


- 


SPB 


SPB 


- 


_ 


SPB 


_ 



PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 16 



RRC PC LI 



Wholesale trade, warehousing and distribu- 
tion - SBA SBA 

Open storage of raw materials, finished 
goods, or construction equipment and 
structures for storing such equipment P° 

ACCESSORY USE 

Non-habitable solar energy collection 
apparatus P P P 

Home occupation ? ~ 

Private day nursery or kindergarten SBA^ SBA^ 

Private guesthouse, toolshed, playhouse, 
tennis court, boathouse, or other similar 
accessory structure; storage of boats and 
boat trailers; private garage for motor 
vehicles, or more than one vehicle owned 
by a non-resident of the premises P 

Accessory off-street parking and loading 
facilities P P 

Unregistered motor vehicles: 
two (2) or less P P P 

more than two (2) in an enclosed building P P P 
more than two (2) not in an enclosed 
building SBA 10 SBA 10 SBA 10 

Accessory outside storage clearly neces- 
sary to the operation and conduct of a 
permitted principal wholesale, transpor- 
tation, industrial and/or commercial use, 
provided: it shall be screened from view 
outside the premises - SBA P 

Newsstand, barber shop, dining room or 
cafeteria, and similar accessory services 
primarily for occupants or users thereof 
within a hotel, office, industrial build- 
ing or hospital - P 15 SBA 15 

Landfill, dredging, or draining - 

Signs P P P 

Gardens, orchards, nurseries, or silvicul- 
ture P P P 

Keeping, raising, and breeding of farm 
animals, such as poultry, horses, live- 
stock or other farm animals, or insects 
for use only by residents of the premises 
on one (1) acre or more 
on less than one (1) acre 

Fine arts instructional programs 

In-Ground Swimming Pools 

Wastewater Plant or Package Wastewater 
Plant or Power Plant (Amended 4/6/87) 

Storage Trailers, Temporary Use (Am'd 4/4/88) 

Storage Trailers, Permanent Use (Am'd 4/4/88) 



-45- 



p 


- 


- 


p 

pl3 


pll 
P 13 


- 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


P12 


P12 


P12 



4. Amend the Footnotes to the Use Regulations of SECTION V. as follows: 

a. To footnote 4, following the words "...from any street lot line...", 
substitute a comma for a period and add "except for lots abutting 
Route One in the Limited Industrial District, in which case the set- 
back shall be at least one hundred (100) feet from such highway." 

b. Following footnote 13, add: 

"14. Provided that no more than 50% of the gross floor area of a 
building of two stories and no more than 33% of the gross 
floor area of a building of three stories within one lot is 
used for said use and that said use is limited to the first 
floor of any building. However, in no instance shall be gross 
floor area of a building or buildings within a lot for said 
use be greater than 35,000 square feet. 

15. Provided that no more than 5% of the gross floor area of a 
building within a lot is used for said use. 

16. In the Planned Commercial and Limited Industrial Districts, 
when a Site Plan Review is required per SECTION X. of this by- 
law and a use is subject to special permit approval, the spe- 
cial permit granting authority (SPGA) shall be the Planning 
Board, notwithstanding the SPGA designated in the Table of 
Uses." 

5. Amend SECTION VI. E. Screening Requirements , by: 

a. Adding the words "...Planned Commercial, and Limited Industrial 
Districts..." following the words "...except the Business 
District..." in the first paragraph of this section; 

b. Adding the words "Except in the Planned Commercial and Limited 
Industrial Districts..." prior to the words "by Special Permit..." 
which currently begins the second paragraph of this section; and 

c. Adding a new final paragraph as follows: 

"In the Planned Commercial and Limited Industrial Districts, a 
landscape and screening plan shall be provided for the entire site. 
The landscape plan shall provide for adequate screening as necessary 
from the street and abutting lots. Such screening shall consist of 
densely planted evergreen shrubs, trees, and/or berms which form an 
opaque barrier." 

6. Amend the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by: deleting 
"(RRA & RRB)" under "Rural Residence" and Substituting "(RRA, RRB, and 
RRC)"; and adding "Planned Commercial" after "Business" and "Limited 
Industrial" after "Industrial" under the column "District"; and by 
adding the dimensional and density regulations and other information for 
these districts as follows: 



-46- 



TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS 









MINIMUM 


MINIMUM 






MINIMUM 


LOT 


LOT 






LOT AREA 


WIDTH 


FRONTAGE 


DISTRICT 


USE 


(SQ.FT.) 


(FT.) 


(FT.) 


RURAL 










RESIDENCE 










(RRA, RRB 


S-Fami ly 


43,560 


190 


50 


& RRC) 


detached 










S-Fami ly 


See S.IXA 


20 


20 




attached 








PLANNED 










COMMERCIAL 


Commercial 
Wholesale 
Transport . 


87,120 


170 


70 




& Industrial 


87,120 


170 


50 




All Otner 










Permitted 










Uses 


87,120 


170 


70 


LIMITED 










INDUSTRIAL 


Wholesale 









Transport . 

& Industrial 87,120 190 
All Other 
Permitted 
Uses 87,120 190 



MINIMUM YARDS 
FRONT SIDE REAR 
(FT.) (FT.) (FT.) 



MAXIMUM MINIMUM 
BUILDING OPEN 
AREA SPACE 
(%) (%) 



50 12 40 12 30 12 20 



50 



20 12 4 > 12 20 12 See S.IXA See S.IX 

9.a/9.b 



50 13 25 13 50 13 



40 



50 13 25 13 50 13 15 



50 13 25 13 50 13 15 



70 50 14 > 15 25 14 50 14 40 



70 50 14 > 15 25l 4 50 14 15 



3016 



40l6 



40 16 



30 



40 



16 



16 



7. Amend the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations Footnotes By: 

a. Adding to footnote 1. the words "Except in the Rural Residence C, the 

Planned Commercial, and the Limited Industrial Districts, " prior 

to the words "no building in any district " 

b. Adding the following new footnotes: 

"12. Provided that a minimum of fifty (50) feet measured from the 
property line abutting Route One shall be landscaped with 
trees of a minimum caliper of 3.5 inches and a minimum density 
within the fifty foot buffer of one tree per one hundred (100) 
square feet in accordance with a landscape plan approved by 
the Planning Board. No active recreational uses, such as ten- 
nis courts or swimming pools shall be permitted within the 
fifty (50) foot landscaped setback. 

13. Provided that a minimum of twenty (20) feet measured from the 
property line abutting Route One shall be landscaped with 
trees of a minimum caliper of 3.5 inches and a minimum density 
within the twenty foot buffer of one tree per one hundred 
(100) square feet in accordance with a landscape plan approved 
by the Planning Board. 



-47- 



14. The setback from Route One, whether a front, side, or rear 
yard, shall be minimum of one hundred (100) feet. 

15. Provided that a minimum of fifty (50) feet measured from the 
property line abutting Route One shall be landscaped with 
trees of a minimum caliper of 3.5 inches and a minimum density 
within this fifty foot buffer of one tree per one hundred 
(100) square feet in accordance with a landscape plan approved 
by the Planning Board. 

16. No more than fifty percent (50%) of the open area shall be 
wetland. " 

8. Amend SECTION VII. A. Parking Requirements by adding section 11. as 
fol lows: 

"11. For all retail establishments, professional and business offi- 
ces and services or research offices and establishments within 
the Planned Commercial District except dentists' and doctors' 
offices, one (1) space for each professional or one (1) space 
for eyery three hundred (300) square feet of gross floor area, 
whichever is greater. For dentists' and doctors' offices 
within the Planned Commercial District, three spaces for each 
professional or one (1) space for each three hundred (300) 
square feet of gross floor area, whichever is greater." 

9. Amend SECTION VII. C. Design and Layout , section 6. by adding the words 
"and the Limited Industrial District" after the words "Industrial 
District." Further amend this section by adding the following after the 
first and prior to the second sentence: 

"However, within the Limited Industrial District, no parking facili- 
ties shall be located within the required fifty (50) foot landscaped 
setback from Route One. Further, within the Planned Commercial 
District, no parking facilities shall be allowed within the required 
twenty (20) foot landscaped setback from Route One; however, a maxi- 
mum of fifteen percent (15%) of the total number of required parking 
spaces of a lot may be located within the remaining portion of the 
minimum setback from Route One not subject to landscape require- 
ments. Also, except as noted above in this section, in the Planned 
Commercial, Limited Industrial and Rural Residence C Districts, in 
no instance shall any parking or loading be allowed in any of the 
minimum yard requirements or required open space." 

10. Amend SECTION IX. A. Open Space Preservation Zoning as follows: 

a. In section 1., substitute for the words "RRA and RRB Districts" the 
words "RRA, RRB, and RRC Districts " 

b. Add a new section 3 as follows: "For the purpose of SECTION IX, 
"Preserved Open Space" shall mean any open space of any ten-acre 
minimum tract which meets the requirements of SECTION IX and which 
meets the conveyance requirements of SECTION IX. A. 11. Such 
Preserved Open Space shall not include any open space which falls 
within any lot that constitutes a portion of any ten-acre minimum 
tract subject to SECTION IX and which is designated or may be 
designated for construction of a single family dwelling as a prin- 
cipal use. The "Minimum Open Space" requirement as designated on 

-48- 



the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations of this by-law 
shall not be met by any open space designated as "Preserved Open 
Space". The "Minimum Open Space" requirement shall apply to each 
lot designated or to be designated for construction of a single 
family dwelling as a principal use." Renumber existing sections 3 
through 15 as 4 through 16. 

c. In existing section 7. a., substitute for the words "Notwithstanding 
the zoning district within which the property is located," the words 
"In the RRA and RRB Districts, notwithstanding the requirements of 
these districts cited elsewhere in this by-law, " 

d. In existing 7.b., add the words "in the RRA and RRB Districts, not- 
withstanding the requirements of these districts cited elsewhere in 
this by-law,..." following the word "apply". 

e. In the existing section 9, delete the word "or" following the words 
"per Section 7. a" and add the words "at least thirty-three percent 
(33%) as per Section 9. a., or at least sixty percent (60%) as per 
Section 9.b, " 

f. In the existing Section 13, add the words "in the RRA and RRB 
Districts" after the word "follows". 

g. After existing Section 9, add the following: 

"9. a. In the RRC District, notwithstanding the requirements of this 
district cited elsewhere in this by-law, if the minimum pre- 
served open space is 33% or more, the following requirements 
shall apply: 

(1) Only single-family detached houses shall be permitted. 

(2) The total number of dwelling units for any tract which 
meets the ten-acre minimum tract size requirement shall 
be not more than 20% greater than the number determined 
in accordance with SECTION IX. A. 5. 

(3) For each lot located within any ten-acre minimum tract, 
the minimum lot size shall be 20,000 square feet. 

(4) For each lot located within any ten-acre minimum tract, 
the minimum lot width shall be 100 feet, the minimum lot 
frontage shall be 50 feet, the minimum front, side, and 
rear setbacks shall be 50 feet, 20 feet (per side), and 
30 feet, respectively, and the maximum building coverage 
shall be 20%. 

(5) For the purpose of meeting the preserved open space 
requirement of SECTION IX. A. 9a, no more than 25% of the 
wetlands located within any tract meeting the ten-acre 
minimum tract size requirement shall be considered pre- 
served open space. 

(6) The provisions of SECTION IX which apply to the RRC 
District may be applied to any lot split between the RRC 
and RRA District at the time of the adoption of this sec- 
tion, including that portion of the lot falling within 
the RRA District. 



-49 



(7) Notwithstanding the requirements of SECTION X.B. of this 
by-law, any ten-acre minimum tract proposed for Open 
Space Preservation Zoning shall be subject to site plan 
review in accordance with the provisions of SECTION X. 

9.b. In the RRC District, notwithstanding the requirements of this 
district cited elsewhere in the by-law, if the minimum pre- 
served open space is 60% or more, the following requirements 
shall apply. 

(1) On single-family detached or attached dwellings shall be 
permitted . 

(2) The total number of dwelling units for any tract which 
meets the ten-acre minimum tract size requirement shall 
be not more than 20% greater than the number determined 
in accordance with SECTION IX. A. 6. 

(3) For the single-family attached dwelling, the following 
shall apply: 

(a) For each lot located within any ten-acre minimum 
tract, the minimum lot size shall be 10,000 square 
feet. 

(b) For each lot located within any ten-acre minimum 
tract, the minimum lot width shall be 50 feet, the 
minimum lot frontage shall be 50 feet, the minimum 
front, side and rear setbacks shall be 20 feet, 
feet, and 20 feet, respectively, and the maximum 
building coverage shall be 20%. 

(c) No more than two single-family attached dwellings 
shall be permitted in one building. 

(d) The minimum distance between buildings consisting of 
attached dwellings shall be fifty (50) feet. 

(4) Dimensional regulations for the single-family detached 
dwelling shall be as indicated in SECTION IX. A. 9a. In 
addition, for each single-family detached dwelling, the 
total amount of the minimum preserved open space (equal 
to 60%), may be reduced by 5000 square feet, but in no 
instance shall the amount of preserved open space be less 
than 40%. 

(5) The requirements of SECTION IX. A. 9a. 5-7 shall apply. 

11. Amend SECTION X. C. General Standards by adding a new standard following 
section 7 as follows: 

"8. Protection and preservation of existing natural features and 

vistas; " 
and, further amend this section by renumbering the current section 8 as 
section 9. ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Benjamin Fierro III, Chairman, Master Plan Commission, moved that the Protec- 
tive Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich be amended as presented in Article 2 
of the Warrant for the October 22, 1990 Special Town Meeting, a copy of which 
is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town Moderator, and is incorporated 
herein -by reference, and with the following changes: 

1) Amend SECTION IV. B. Intent of Districts to read as follows: 

a. Following section 3, add: "4. The Planned Commercial District is 
intended for non-residential uses. Office, service and limited retail uses 

-50- 



are permitted; designated retail, research and development, warehouse and 
other commercial uses require a special permit. Enclosed manufacturing is 
prohibited. The district is intended to preserve the natural features and 
vistas of the Route One Corridor. The district is not served by municipal 
sewerage or water." 

2) Amend SECTION V.D. Table of Use Regulations as follows: 
"ACCESSORY USE RRC PC LI 
Private day nursery or kindergarten SBA-2 P-2 - ;" 

3) Amend SECTION V.D. Table of Use Regulations , the fifth line of the pro- 
posed Footnote #14, the word "be" should be changed to "the"; 

4) Amend SECTION VI.B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by: 

a. deleting all reference to Footnote #16 in the MINIMUM OPEN SPACE (%) 
column; and 

b. deleting footnote #16 which presently reads: "No more than fifty percent 
(50%) of the area shall be wetland." 

Arthur Knight, an advisor to the Master Plan Subcommittee made a fifteen 
minute presentation with slides showing the proposed zoning changes along 
Route One Corridor. He explained in detail the three new districts and the 
four amendments to the Planned Commercial District. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee and Planning Board unanimously recommended. Nancy Carter 
Harrington agreed with the article but felt it should have been brought up at 
the Annual Town Meeting. Robert McNeil, formerly of the Master Plan 
Commission worked on the article and urged voters to support the article. A 
voice vote was inconclusive; on a hand count the motion passed 285-5. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich to provide for the appointment of an associate member of the 
Planning Board: 

1. To amend Section XI. (Administration) to add a new subsection "H." as 
fol lows: 

H. Planning Board 

The Planning Board consisting of five (5) regular members and one (1) 
associate member shall be appointed as provided in Section 13 of Chapter 
620 of the Acts of 1966 (The Charter of the Town of Ipswich), Chapter 41, 
Section 81-A and Chapter 40A, Section 9 of the General Laws. The associate 
member shall be appointed by the Town Manager and shall serve for a two- 
year period. The chairman of the Planning Board may designate the assoc- 
iate member to sit for the purposes of acting on a special permit appli- 
cation, in the case of absence, inability to act, conflict of interest on 
the part of any regular member of the Board, and/or in the event of a 
vacancy. 



-51- 



Subsection "H" (Special Permits) becoming Subsection "I"; 
Subsection "I" (Variances) becoming Subsection "J"; 
Subsection "J" (Public Hearing Notice Requirements) becoming 

Subsection "K"; 
Subsection "K" (Repeat Action on Appeals, Variances, and Special 

Permits) becoming Subsection "L"; 
Subsection "L" (Amendments) becoming Subsection "M"; 
Subsection "M" (Validity) becoming Subsection "N"; 
Subsection "N" (Effective Date) becoming Subsection "0"; 
Subsection "0" (Acceptance) becoming Subsection "P"; and 
Subsection "P" (Applicability of Amendments to Outstanding Building 

Permits or Special Permits) becoming Subsection "Q" " ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Leslie Brooks moved that the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich 
be amended as presented in Article 3 of the Warrant for the October 22, 1990 
Special Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the 
Town Moderator and is incorporated herein by reference. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen, and the Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion passed by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich" by 1) deleting "SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING 
REGULATIONS" in its entirety; and by 2) adding the following new section in 
lieu thereof: 

" SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 
A. Purpose . The purpose of this section is to ensure that all uses are 
provided with sufficient off-street parking and loading facilities 
to meet the needs of persons employed at and/or utilizing such 
uses; to ensure that off-street parking and loading facilities are 
designed so as to reduce hazards to pedestrians and drivers; to 
reduce congestion in the streets; to reduce nuisance to abuttors 
from noise, fumes and headlight glare; and to reduce environmental 
deterioration to surrounding neighborhoods resulting from glare, 
heat, dust, accelerated storm water run-off, and unattractive views. 



-52- 



6. Parking Requirements . Total automobile storage or parking space per 

principal use shall be provided in accordance with the formulae set 

forth in the following Table of Minimum Parking Requirements herein 
below: 



TABLE OF MINIMUM PARKING REQUIREMENTS 



Principal Use 

Residential Uses 

a. Residence 

b. Hotel , Motel , Inn 

Institutional Uses 

c. Hospital 



Nursing Home, Convalescent 

Home 

Theatre, Auditorium, Stadium, 

or Place of Assembly 

Philanthropic (community 
recreation centers and 
museums ) 



Educational 



1 



Nursery, 
School 



Day Care 



Required Parking Spaces 



One and a half (1-1/2) spaces 

per dwelling unit. 

One space (1) per rental unit 



One (1) space per two (2) beds plus 
three (3) spaces per staff doc- 
tor plus one (1) space per other 
employee on the largest shift. 
One (1) space per two (2) beds. 

One (1) space for e^ery four (4) 
seats to maximum rated capacity 
of the f aci 1 ity . 
One (1) space per two hundred 
and fifty (250) square feet of 
gross floor area. 

One (1) space per staff person 
plus one (1) space per classroom. 
One (1) space for each classroom 
plus one (1) space for each two 
employees or other staff posi- 
tions other than teachers. 



Business Uses 

h. Retail Stores/Business 

Consumer Service (excluding 
professional office and 
clinic) 



Restaurant, 
Hall 



Club or Dance 



j. Clinic/Professional Office 



k. Funeral Establishment 



One (1) space per three hundred 
(300) feet of gross floor area 
on the ground floor plus one (1) 
space per five hundred (500) 
square feet of gross floor area 
on al 1 other floors . 
One (1) space for each one 
hundred (100) square feet of 
gross floor area or one (1) 
space per three (3) seats rated 
to capacity, plus one (1) space 
per employee on the largest 
shift, whichever is greater. 
One (1) space per three hundred 
(300) square feet of gross floor 
area. 

One (1) space per four (4) per- 
sons based on rated maximum 
capacity of faci 1 ity . 



-53- 



Principal Use 



Required Parking Spaces 



1. Repair Shop and Building 
Trade 



m. Auto Service Station, 
Auto Body Shop 



n. Motor Vehicle, Trailer, 
Boat sales and rentals 



Industrial Uses 
o. Manufacturing and other 
Industrial Uses 

p. Wholesale, Distribution and 
Storage in Enclosed Build- 
ings and Warehouses 



q. Open Storage, or other open 
are uses 



One (1) space per employee on 
largest shift plus one (1) space 
for each company vehicle kept on 
the premises. 

Three (3) spaces per repair bay, 
plus one (1) space per employee 
on largest shift, plus one (1) 
space per company vehicle kept 
on the premises. 
One (1) space per fifteen 
hundred (1,500) square feet of 
gross floor area of indoor 
space, plus one (1) space per 
employee on the largest shift. 



One (1) space for every five 
hundred (500) square feet of 
gross floor area. 
One (1) space for every one 
thousand (1,000) square feet of 
gross floor area for up to the 
first ten thousand (10,000) 
square feet of gross floor area, 
plus one (1) space for every 
additional five thousand (5,000) 
square feet of gross floor area. 
One (1) space for every one 
thousand (1,000) square feet of 
the lot devoted to the use 
thereon. 



C. Change of Use or Building Expansions . Where a structure is enlarged 
or a change in an existing use occurs, only the additional parking 
space required need comply with these formulae. 

0. Accessory Use of Parking Areas . No parking space shall be used for 
any activity which interferes with its availability to meet the 
minimum applicable parking requirement. Accessory uses are per- 
mitted and may include, but not be limited to, necessary traffic 
directional signs not exceeding two (2) square feet each in area, 
lighting fixtures for illuminating the parking area, and landscaping 
within buffer areas. 

E. Joint Use of Parking Areas . By special permit of the Zoning Board 
of Appeals, joint use may be made of required parking spaces by 
intermittent use establishments such as churches, assembly halls, or 
theatres, whose peak parking demand does not conflict with that of 
the other use. An agreement shall be made in writing and 
acknowledged by the owner(s) of the uses involved concerning: the 
number of spaces involved; substantiation of the fact that such joint 
use is not overlapping or in conflict; and the duration of the 
agreement. The agreement must be presented with the petition for 
special permit. 



-54- 



F. Fractional Numbers . If the computation of required parking spa- 
ces results in a fractional number, only the fraction of one-half or 
more shall be counted as one. 

G. Mixed Use Facilities . Buildings or lots which contain more than one 
principal use are considered Mixed Use facilities. For the purposes 
of determining parking requirements for such a facility, each use 
component shall be counted as a separate principal use. 

H. Location of Parking Facilities . All required parking or loading 
spaces shall be provided on the same lot as the use or building for 
which they are required; provided, however, that if sufficient spaces 
are unavailable on that lot, the Board may authorize by special per- 
mit an alternative location for non-residential parking subject to 
the following provisions: 

1. The lot to be utilized for parking shall be in the same legal 
ownership as the lot served either by deed, by easement, or by 
long-term lease, no less than thirty (30) years in duration. If 
the lot is leased, the terms of the lease shall be subject to 
the Board's approval as to form and duration. Such deed, ease- 
ment, or notice of lease shall be recorded at the Registry of 
Deeds, and a copy of the same as recorded shall be filed with and 
made part of the application for any building or occupancy per- 
mi t . 

2. The linear distance between the use or building lot and its 
parking lot shall not be more than three hundred (300) feet. 

3. The separate parking lot shall not create unreasonable traffic 
congestion or create a hazard to pedestrians being served by the 
parking lot. 

4. The parking lot shall be properly zoned for the same or a less 
restrictive use as the principal lot being served by the parking 
lot. 

I. Loading Requirements . Minimum off-street loading requirements shall 
be required in accordance with the formulae set forth below for 
e^/ery new structure, new use, enlargement of an existing structure 
and/or change in an existing use. Where the structure is enlarged 
and/or there is a change in the existing use, the formulae shall 
apply only to the enlargement and/or change. 

Off-street loading areas shall be provided in accordance with the 
TABLE OF LOADING REQUIREMENTS as outlined below: 



-55- 



TABLE OF LOADING REQUIREMENTS 



USE 



Wholesale, Distribution, 
Storage & Industrial Uses 



Retai 1 , Hotel and 

Restaurant 

Office, Institution & 

Public Buildings 



Residential 
Mul ti -f ami ly* 



SO. FT. OF GROSS FLOOR AREA 

(In Thousands of Square Feet) 
1-10 11-20 21-40 41-80 81 & Over 



3 



Add . space 
per each 
increment 
of 40. 

Additional space per each 

increment of 20. 

1 2 Add. space 
per each 
increment 
of 100. 

Additional space per each 
increment of 100. 



*The Board may approve by special permit an alternative to the above required 
number of loading spaces. 

J. Design Standards for Parking Facilities 

The minimum dimensions of parking spaces and maneuvering aisles 
shal 1 be as fol lows: 



A- Parkin* ang 
£ Stall Widtfi 

C Distance of 

to euro 

D. Aisle Tridih 

E. Curb Icr.zth 





-56- 



Parking 
Angle 

(A) 
(degrees) 


Stall 

Width 

(B)* 


Stall 

Depth 

(Ox 


Aisle 

Width 

(D) 


Curb 

Length 

(E) 


1-way 


2-way 


0° 
30° 
45° 
60° 
70° 
80° 
90° 


9'- 0" 
9'- 0" 
9'- 0" 
9'- 0" 
9'- 0" 
9'- 0" 
9'- 0" 


NA 
17'. 4" 

19' -10" 
21'- 0" 
21'- 0" 
20'- 4" 
19'- 0" 


12'- 0" 
11'- 0" 
13'- 0" 
18'- 0" 
19'- 0" 
24'- 0" 
25'- 0" 


24'- 0" 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 
25'- 0" 


23'- 0" 

18'- 0" 

12'- 9" 

10'- 6" 

9'- 9" 

9'- 1" 

9'- 0" 



*End spaces, restricted on one of the long sides by curbs, walls, fen- 
ces, or other similar obstructions, shall have a minimum width of ten 
(10) feet, and maneuvering space at the aisle end of at least five (5) 
feet in depth and nine (9) feet in width. 

xMay include no more than two (2) feet of landscaped island or setback 
area at the front of the space, provided there are no obstructions to 
the vehicle's bumper overhang and provided, further, that the bumper 
overhang does not interfere with the availability of the island or set- 
back area for snow storage. 

K. Loading Space Dimensions . Each loading space shall be at least 
twelve (12) feet in width by sixty (60) feet in length, and shall be 
provided with a fourteen (14) foot high clearance. This space shall be 
exclusive of drives, aisles, or maneuvering space. 

L. Parking and Loading Layout . 

1. Circulation - Driveways and parking areas shall be designed with due 
regard to topography, integration with surrounding streets, general 
interior circulation and separation of pedestrian and vehicular 
traffic to reduce hazards to pedestrians and motorists. 

2. Layout - Required parking and loading facilities shall be laid out 
so that each vehicle may proceed to and from its parking space 
without requiring the movement of any other vehicle. The Board may 
waive this requirement for parking facilities under full-time atten- 
dance supervision. 

In no case shall parking or loading spaces be located so as to 
require the backing or maneuvering of a vehicle onto a sidewalk or 
onto a public way in order to enter or leave the space. 



-57- 



3. In no case shall parking or loading spaces be located less than ten 
(10) feet from any side or rear lot line excluding corner lots, as 
provided for under paragraph L.#4. below. 

4. No parking of motor vehicles or driveway serving a parking or 
loading facility shall be located within thirty (30) feet of an 
intersection of two street lines. 

5. Except in the Industrial district, no off-street parking facility 
shall be located within a front yard setback. No off-street loading 
facility shall be located within a front yard in any district. 

**************************************************************************** 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the motion 
shall incorporate Subsection #L.5. hereinbelow, in lieu of #L.5 above. 

"5. Except in the Industrial and the Limited Industrial District, no 
off-street parking facility shall be located within the front yard 
setback. However, within the limited Industrial District, no 
parking facilities shall be located within the required 50 foot 
landscaped setback from Route One. Further, within the Planned 
Commercial District, no parking facilities shall be allowed within 
the required twenty (20) foot landscaped setback from Route One; 
however, a maximum of fifteen percent (15%) of the total number of 
required parking spaces of a lot may be located within the remaining 
portion of the minimum setback from Route One not subject to 
landscape requirements. Also, except as noted above in this section, 
in the Planned Commercial, Limited Industrial and Rural Residence C 
Districts, in no instance shall any parking or loading be allowed in 
any of the minimum yard requirements or required open space." 

**************************************************************************** 

M. Handicapped Parking . Parking facilities shall provide specially- 
designed parking spaces for the physically handicapped in accordance 
with the Rules and Regulations of the Architectural Access Board of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Safety. 

Handicapped spaces shall be clearly identified by signs indicating 
that the spaces are reserved for physically handicapped persons. Such 
spaces shall be located nearest to the handicapped entrance to the use 
or building served. 

N. Surfacing, Drainage and Curbing . All parking facilities shall be 
graded, surfaced with asphalt, concrete or similar, non-erosive 
material, and drained in an adequate manner to prevent nuisance of ero- 
sion or excessive water flow across public ways or abutting properties. 

Entrance and exit driveways shall be defined clearly with curbing, 
signs, and pavement markings. Parking and loading spaces shall be 
marked clearly in accordance with dimensions specified in subsections J, 
K, and M above . 

0. Landscaping . In order to separate parking areas from abutting 
streets, to provide areas for disposal of snow, and to provide visual 

-58- 



relief from expanses of pavement and vehicles, landscaping shall be pro- 
vided in all parking areas containing ten (10) or more parking spaces. 
Landscaping shall be subject to the reasonable approval of the Board, as 
appl icable . 

P. Lighting . All lighting within parking areas shall be arranged so as 
to prevent direct glare upon any public way or upon any other abutting 
property. Lighting shall be provided, where desirable, to improve 
safety and visibility of the lot. 

Q. Maintenance . Parking and loading facilities and landscaping shall be 
continuously maintained in good condition to ensure continued compliance 
with the provisions of this section." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Catherine Lefebvre moved that the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich be amended as presented in Article 4 of the Warrant for the October 22, 
1990 Special Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and 
Town Moderator, and is incorporated herein by reference, and with the 
following changes: 

1) Amend the word "Board" in the fourth line of subsection H. and in the 
fiftn line of subsection H.l. to read "Zoning Board of Appeals"; 

2) Amend the word "Board" in I. Table of Loading Requirements to read 
"Planning Board"; 

3) Amend reference to "Article 4" in the Alternative section which refers to 
Route One Corridor Zoning and is designated by starred area by renumerating 
it as "Article 2". 

Planning Board unanimously recommended, Finance Committee voted 6-0 against, 
Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Catherine Lefebvre spoke in 
favor saying this was a very comprehensive and logical approach providing 
more flexibility in the layout and design of parking laws. Bill Craft could 
foresee problems with the by-law and Allen Swan gave examples of possible 
problems. James Engel spoke in favor noting defects in the by-law as cosme- 
tic, and that it is impossible to create the perfect zoning by-law. Stanley 
Bornstein and Carl Gardner also spoke in favor. On a hand count the motion 
passed 227-32. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Ipswich" as follows: 

1(a) To delete SECTION X. ("Site Plan Review") B. ("Applicability") which 
reads as follows: 

"No building permit shall be issued for the construction of any new com- 
munity facility, commercial, industrial, or business building or for any 
addition(s) or alteration (s ) in excess of 2,500 square feet of gross floor 
area of any existing community facility, commercial, industrial, or busi- 
ness building or the construction of any drive-through facility, unless a 
site plan has been submitted and approved in accordance with the require- 
ments set forth in this section." ; and 



-59- 



1(b) To replace the former SECTION X. B. with the following new SECTION X. B. 
as follows: 

"6. Appl icabi 1 ity 

No building permit shall be issued for the construction of any new com- 
munity facility, commercial, industrial or business building; for any 
additions or alterations in excess of 2,500 square feet or 30% of the 
existing gross floor area, whichever is less, which has been constructed 
within a consecutive two-year period; for construction of any drive- 
through facility; or for any change of use which increases the required 
parking spaces by ten spaces and/or triggers the requirement of a new 
loading zone." 

2(a) To delete within SECTION X. D. Submission Procedure the line: 

"The completed application, together with the documentation required by 
this section, shall then be submitted by the applicant to the Board, 
accompanied by an application fee of fifty dollars ($50.)." ; and 

2(b) Replace said line with the following: 

The completed application, together with the documentation required by 
this section, shall then be submitted by the applicant to the Board, 
accompanied by an application fee."; and 

3(a) To delete the last line in SECTION X. G. which presently reads: 

"The costs for any professional review shall be borne by the applicant 
but shall not exceed three hundred dollars ($300) plus twenty-five 
dollars ($25.) per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area."; and 

3(b) Replace said line with the following: 

"The costs for any professional review (other than Town staff review) 
shall be borne by the Applicant. Costs shall be reasonable and in con- 
formance with the Special Municipal Accounts Procedure outlined in the 
Planning Board's site Plan Review Application Checklist." ; and 

4(a) To delete the first portion of the first line of SECTION X. H. Waiver , 
which presently reads: 

"The Board may waive, by an affirmative vote of four (4) out of five (5) 
members..."; and 

4(b) Replace said portion of the first two lines with the following: 

"The Board may waive, by an affirmative vote of three (3) out of five 
(5.) members . . . . " . 

5(a) To delete SECTION X. I. Application and Checklist which presently reads: 

"The Board shall adopt an application form and checklist to assist appli 
cants in complying with these provisions."; and 



-60- 



5(b) Replace said sentence with the following: 

"The Board shall adopt an application form, checklist, and regulations 
to assist applicants in complying with these provisions." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Web Bingham moved that the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich 
be amended as presented in Article 5 of the Warrant for the October 22, 
1990 Special Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk 
and the Town Moderator and is incorporated herein by reference. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously approved, Finance Committee unanimously 
voted not to recommend, Planning Board recommends (waiving small 
businesses). Mr. Bingham spoke in favor of the proposed changes making the 
by-law stronger. Stanley Bornstein and James Engel spoke in favor and 
urged votors support. Jamie Fay read an amendment which was seconded to 
delete the phrase in 1(b) "or 30i of the existing gross floor area, 
whichever is less." Planning Board against, Board of Selectmen against, 
Finance Committee in favor of amendment. The amendment failed on a voice 
vote. On a hand count, the motion passed 226-37. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Ipswich" by: 

1. Deleting "SECTION VIII. SIGNS" in its entirety and replace same with 
the following language: 

" SECTION VIII. SIGNS 

A. Purpose 

The purpose of this by-law is to regulate all exterior signs and all 
interior signs placed for exterior viewing from public ways and pla- 
ces, but not located on Town property. It is also intended to limit 
clutter of uncontrolled signage, to integrate signs with Ipswich's 
unique and historic environment, and improve the effectiveness of 
individual signs through emphasis on appropriate design. 

B. Appl ication 

A sign, whether temporary or permanent, shall require a building 
permit. International and national flags, and temporary signs for 
political or charitable purposes or for public organizations, are 
exempt from the provisions of this section. 

C. Definitions 

Area of Sign : The measurement (in square footage) of a planar region 
or of the surface of a solid and/or three-dimensional form. 
Calculations of areas of signs shall use the following formulae: 

1. Hanging Sign (double faced): use the area of one side (see 
di agram); 

2. Three-Dimensional Sign: calculate the projected area of both the 
front view and one side view of the sign, then use one-half of 
the total of these two areas (see diagram); 

3. Irregularly shaped signs: use the area of the smallest rec- 
tangular plane geometric figure that will wholly contain the 
sign (see diagram) . 

-61- 




! ---i o 





2: t'.CH 



Awning : Any temporary or retractable covering or shelter which is 
supported entirely from the exterior wall(s) of a building. 

Bracket : A device used to attach a sign to a building other than 
with screws or bolts. 

Clearance : A completely open and unobstructed space measured 
from the ground level, to the lowest portion of a hanging sign. 
No less than ten feet (10 1 ) clearance shall be allowed unless 
this restriction is waived. In granting a Special Permit waiver 
the Permit Granting Authority shall find that the reduced 
height shal 1 : 

1) not create a hazard to pedestrian or vehicular traffic; 

2) shall be in keeping or consistent with the majority of the 
remaining conforming signs within the district; and 

3) shall comply with all other requirements of this by-law. 

II 1 umi nation : The act of supplying or brightening a sign with 
light. Lighted signs shall be illuminated only by a steady, 
stationary light without causing harmful glare for motorists, 
pedestrians or neighboring premises. Sign illumination is per- 
mitted only between the hours of seven o'clock in the morning 



-62- 



and eleven o'clock in the evening, except that signs may be 
illuminated during any hours establishments are open to the 
public. The sources of artificial light shall include; enclosed 
or protected neon (exposed illuminated neon shall not be allowed), 
lighting from an exterior source and/or internal lighting; but 
all flashing, changing, or intermittent illumination is prohi- 
bited, except for time/temperature signs. 

Lineal Frontage : The length in feet which a building or lot abuts 
a street or right of way at its first floor or entrance level. 

Permit Granting Authority : The Town of Ipswich Zoning Board 
of Appeals . 

Projec 



bui ldi 
a buil 
whiche 

Sign : 
incl ud 
charac 
pic tor 
matter 
fasten 
same s 
place, 
articl 
any ma 



tion : To ext 
ng . Signs s 
ding or two- 
ver is less. 



Any fa 
i ng its 

ter, ma 
ial pic 

or ill 
ed , or 
hall be 

subjec 
e, mach 
nner ou 



brica 
stru 
rk, p 
ture 
umi na 
manuf 
used 
t, pe 
ine, 
t of 



end forward or out from a facade of a 

hall project no more than five feet (5') from 

thirds (2/3) of the width of the sidewalk, 



ted sign or outdoor display structure, 
cture, consisting of any letter, figure, 
oint, plan, marque(s), sign, design, poster, 
stroke, stripe, line, trademark, reading 
ting device, constructed, attached, erected, 
actured in any manner whatsoever so that the 
for the attraction of the public to any 
rson, firm, corporation, public performance, 
or merchandise whatsoever, and displayed in 
doors for recognized advertising purposes. 




Signs" shall be divided into the following categories: 

Banner Sign : Any sign constructed of fabric or flexible 
material. Pennants and flags are banner signs and 
may be used as permanent or temporary signs. A flag or pen- 
nant shall not exceed six (6) square feet in size; a 
banner shall not exceed thirty (30) square feet in size. 

Directory Sign : Any sign which contains listings of two or 
more commercial uses or users. A directory sign shall be 
designed and constructed with provisions for changes of listing 
without reconstruction of the entire sign. 

Free-standing Sign : Any sign structurally separate from the 
building, being supported on itself, on a standard, or on legs. 

Hanging Sign : Any sign supported by a building wall(s) and not 
parallel to it, and which projects eight (8) inches or more. 

Plaque or Historic Marker : A permanent, non-illuminated sign 
which identifies a structure or site designated by the Ipswich 
Historical Commission as being historically significant. In the 



-63- 



case of a structure, said sign shall be attached parallel to the 
structure and shall not exceed three (3) square feet. In the 
case of a site, said sign shall be placed on the structure or 
shall be free-standing, and shall not exceed three (3) square 
feet in area. The sign area for a plaque or historic marker 
shall not be figured in the allowable sign area for the 
building . 

Temporary Sign : A sign which is intended for a limited period 
of display. A temporary sign may be erected for a period not to 
exceed sixty (60) consecutive days if it falls within the 
following categories. A temporary sign which does not meet the 
following criteria shall be subject to the same requirements as 
for permanent signs. 

1. Poster-type signs, construction signs, and real estate 
signs are considered temporary signs provided they meet 
the following necessary criteria: 

a) Poster-type sign: 

- may not occupy more than 20% of window area 

- shall be related to use conducted or goods available on 

premises 

- may not be used for more than twenty-one (21) con- 

secutive calendar days. 

b) Construction sign: 

- identifies parties involved in construction on the 

same premises only 

- shall not contain advertising 

- shall not be utilized for more than one (1) year, or for 

the duration of work on the lot, whichever is longer 

- shall not exceed sixteen (16) square feet in area 

- shall be removed promptly by contractor within 

fourteen (14) calendar days of the completion of work. 

c) Real Estate sign: 

- shall be related to sale, rental, or lease of same lot 

- shall not be more than four (4) square feet in area 

- shall be removed within seven (7) calendar days after 
sale, rental , or lease . 

d) Sandwich Board sign: 

- shall not be more than six (6) square feet in area, 

as calculated by hanging sign area of sign 

- shall not impair visibility or ability to use any 

public way or public area. 

2. Any banner shall be considered a temporary sign provided it 
meets the following criteria: 

a) A Banner(s) intended to advertise a business establishment 
prior to permanent signing: 

- shall be erected for a maximum of thirty (30) calendar 

days 

- shall be no larger than twenty (20) square feet in area 

per business 

- may contain a message 

- shall be attached to the structure. 

b) A Banner intended to advertise an event: 



-64- 



- shall be no greater than one (1) foot per lineal foot of 

frontage if placement is on a building 

- shall be no greater than thirty (30) square feet in area 

if placed across a public street. 



Wall Sign : Any sign painted on or affixed to a building wall is 
a wall sign. Wall signs consist of two basic categories: 

1. Directly applied: painted, or three-dimensional 
letters applied directly to a building surface. 

2. Independent Wall Sign: painted, incised or three- 
dimensional letters affixed to a sign board which is then 
attached to a building surface. 

Window Sign : Any sign which is permanently affixed to the sur- 
face of the glass of any part of any building. Any sign(s) 
affixed to the glass is part of the total permissible sign area 
for that frontage and shall not occupy more than ten percent 
(10%) of the glass area. Any sign visible through a window on a 
permanent basis shall be considered as a window sign even though 
it may not be affixed directly to the glass. 

Spacing : The distance between the letters in a word, between 
individual words, and/or between lettering and any other com- 
ponents of a sign. 

C. Sign Requirements per Zoning District 



No sign shall be 

requirements : 

1. In Rural Res 

signs for re 

conform to a 

a. One sign 
of the occup 
feet in area 

b. One sign 
to the ident 

c. One real 

d . One cons 

e. One plaq 

f. One free 
subdivi si on 
exceed twelv 
shall be no 
shall be no 
and the sign 
di stances . 



permitted except that which meets the following 



idence A and 
sidential use 
ny of the fol 
displaying t 
ants of the p 

not exceedin 
if i cation of 

estate sign; 
truction sign 
ue or histori 

standing sig 
or multi -fami 
e (12) square 
higher than f 
closer than t 

shall not in 



B and Intown Residence Districts, 
s may not be illuminated and shall 
lowing requirements: 
he street number and name or names 
remises, not exceeding two square 

g two square feet in area limited 
a permitted home occupation; 

; and/or 
c marker; 

n per main entrance of any 
ly development, which shall not 
feet in area. The top of the sign 
our (4) feet above grade, the sign 
en (10) feet to the street line, 
terfere with the required sight 



************************************************************************ 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the 

motion shall incorporate "RRC" within this subsection. 
************************************************************************ 



-65- 



2. In Rural Residence A and B and in Intown Residential 
Districts, the following requirements shall apply for non- 
conforming business uses, and for religious, educational, 
public, philanthropic or agricultural uses: 

a. All signs listed in C.l, a. thru f. inclusive are per- 

permitted; 

b. One temporary banner is permitted; 

c. One wall sign which shall be no greater than twenty (20) 
square feet (or the size of the existing sign), whichever is 
smaller, is permitted. 

************************************************************************ 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the 

motion shall incorporate "RRC" within this subsection. 
************************************************************************ 

3. In Business Districts along Routes 133 and 1A (from the 
Brum' Property to Saltonstall Brook; from Kimball Avenue to 
Mile Lane; and within the Business zoned property at the 
Rowley town line) and for business uses along the Newburyport 
Turnpike (Route One), the following signs are permitted: 

a. All signs listed in C.l. a. thru f. inclusive are permitted; 

b. One temporary banner is permitted; 

c. One wall sign which shall be no greater than thirty (30) 
square feet per business is permitted; 

d. One directory sign for lots with two (2) or more busi- 
nesses and for all uses in common ownership. Said sign 
shall be no greater than fifty (50) square feet in total 
area, with each business having a maximum of eight (8) 
square feet in area. This sign may be a free-standing sign 
or a wall sign. If a free standing sign is used, said sign 
shall be ten (10) feet from the property line and four (4) 
feet above grade; and/or 

e. Off -premises, free-standing signs, each of which shall be 
no more than twenty (20) square feet in area, may be permitted 
by Special Permit of the Board of Zoning Appeals. 

***************************************** ********************************* 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the 

motion shall incorporate "Planned Commercial (PC)" within this category. 
************************ ************************************************** 

4. In Business and Industrial -Zoned Districts within the center 
of Ipswich (Lord Square, Washington Street, Downtown 
Business district and South Main Street) the following 
signs are permitted for business uses: 

a. All signs allowed in C.l. a thru f. inclusive; 

b. Hanging signs which are supported by a building wall or 
bracket. Any such sign shall not exceed eight (8) square feet 
in area and shall not have a projection greater than five 

(5) feet from the building or two-thirds of the width of the 
sidewalk, whichever is less. Each said sign shall also have 
required clearance; 

c. One temporary banner sign; 

d. Temporary window signs; 

e. One temporary sandwich board sign by special permit of 
the Zoning Board of Appeals; and 

f. Awnings. 

-66- 



5. In all Industrial districts, except those found in the 
center of Ipswich, the following signs are permitted: 

a. All signs found in #3., with the exception that wall 
signs shall be no greater than twenty (20) square feet in area 

**************** *******^^ 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the 

motion shall incorporate "Limited Industrial (LI)" within this category. 
****•****•***•****•••**********************••*******•*******•*•***•**•••• 

6. In all districts the following additional signs are permitted: 

a. Any free-standing sign identifying an exit, an entrance, 
and/or parking area situated at or near each entrance, pro- 
vided that no portion of the sign is from two (2) to eight 
(8) feet above ground level and no area exceeds two (2) 
square feet; 

b. One attached sign, not exceeding four (4) square feet in 
area, at the rear of a building, for the sole purpose of 
facilitating deliveries, entrance of the public from a 

rear parking lot, or directional or warning signs per- 
taining to traffic or parking directions. 



D. Non-Conformance of Signs 
A sign legally erected befo 
does not conform to the pro 
to be maintained without a 
shall conform to the provis 
the By-law, it is enlarged, 
cated . Any exemption provi 
shall terminate with respec 

1. Advertises a permitted 

2. Advertises or calls att 
activity which is no lo 
generally or on the lot 



re the adoption of this By-law which 
visions of this By-law may continue 
permit, provided that any such sign 
ions hereof if, after the adoption of 
altered, replaced, changed, or relo- 
ded for in this section of the By-law 
t to any sign which: 
use that has been discontinued; or 
ention to any product, business, or 
nger sold or carried on, whether 



E. Permit and Appeal 

1. No person shall install, erect, or alter a sign without 
having obtained in advance a permit for said sign. 

2. Any appeal under sub-sections B., C, or D. shall be made 
to the Zoning Board of Appeals." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Ken Savoie moved that the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich be 
amended as presented in Article 6 of the Warrant for the October 22, 1990 
Special Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the 
Town Moderator and is incorporated herein by reference wit the following 
changes: 

1) In SECTION VIII. Signs 

B. Application - A sign, whether temporary or permanent, shall require a 
building permit. Flags and temporary signs for political or chari- 
table purposes, public organizations, states and political sub- 
divisions thereof, and international and national flags are exempt 
from the provisions of tnis section. 



-67- 



2) In subsection C. (Definitions), the last line of the definition of 
"Illumination", shall read: The sources of artificial light shall include 
enclosed or protected neon (exposed illuminated neon shall not be allowed), 
and lighting from an exterior source and/or internal lighting; but all 
flashing, changing, or intermittent illumination is prohibited, except for 
time/temperature signs and holiday decorations"; 

3) In subsection C. (Definitions), the third sentence in the definition of 
"Banner sign" shall read: "A flag or pennant shall not exceed fifteen (15) 
square feet in size; a banner shall not exceed thirty (30) square feet in 
size"; 

4) In subsection C. (Definitions), the definition of "Window sign" shall 
read: "Any sign which is permanently affixed to the surface of the glass of 
any part of the building. Any sign(s) affixed to the glass shall not occupy 
more than ten percent (10%) of the glass area. Any sign visible through a 
window on a permanent basis shall be considered as a window sign even though 
it may not be affixed directly to the glass. Said sign area shall not be 
included as a part of the total permissible sign area for that frontage"; 

5) In all Alternative sections, which reference the Route One Corridor 
Zoning and are designated by starred areas, "Article 4" is renumerated as 
"Article 2"; 

6) Amend subsection "C." (Sign Requirements per Zoning District) to become 
subsection "D."' 

Amend subsection "D." (Non-conformance of Signs) to become subsection 

up ii . 

Amend subsection "E." (Permit and Appeal) to become subsection "F."; 

7) Amend subsection "0" (Sign Requirements per Zoning District) by: 

1. Adding to #1 the words "except street numbers and names of occupants" 
after the word "uses"; 

2. Adding to #2 the letter "d" which reads: 

"d. one temporary sandwich board sign by special permit of the 
Zoning Board of Appeals"; 

3. Changing #3, the letter "d" to read: 

"One directory sign for lots with two (2) or more businesses and for 
all uses in common ownership. Said sign shall be not greater than 
fifty (50) square feet in total area, with each business having a 
maximum of eight (8) square feet in area. For lots containing a 
single business use, a sign of twenty (20) square feet in total area 
shall be allowed. Signs for either a single business use or multiple 
business use may be either free-standing signs or wall signs. If a 
free standing sign is used, said sign shall be ten (10) feet from the 
property line and four (4) feet above grade: and/or" 

4. Adding to #3 the letters "f" and "g" which read: 

"f. one temporary sandwich board sign by special permit of the 

Zoning Board of Appeals; 
g. temporary window signs;" 

-68- 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously supports, Finance Committee sup- 
ports 4-2, Planning Board supports the article. Nancy Carter Harrington said 
we needed to pass this article in support of local businesses. Ursula 
Clements, President of the newly formed Ipswich Merchant's Association said 
it was a compromise agreement that would help local businesses and urged 
voters to support the amended article. Dan Doucette, whose wife operates a 
print shop on Central Street, presented an amendment to increase the size of 
window signs from 10% to 50% of the window area. He argued a limit on window 
signs to 10% of the window area was too strict. Planning Board opposed to 
the change in the amendment, Finance Committee 4-2 in favor, Board of 
Selectmen unanimously against amendment. James Engel said the new By-Law was 
not perfect but a lot better than the existing one. Stanley Bornstein said 
there were numerous meetings with the merchants to work out an amiable 
compromise. The amendment failed on a majority voice vote. The motion 
passed on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Ipswich" by 

(la.) deleting "SECTION VI. E. Screening Requirements " in its entirety; and 
(lb.) replacing said section with the following new section VI. E.: 

E. Screening Requirements . Screening shall be required in the mini- 
mum side and rear yards of any new wholesale, transportation, 
industrial, commercial or multi-family use in all districts. 
Screening shall consist of a strip of plantings and/or fencing six (6) 
feet in height, and shall be at least ten (10) feet in width, except 
where a use abuts a Rural or Intown Residence district boundary in 
which case it shall be fifty (50) feet in width for the rural district 
and twenty (20) feet in width for the Intown Residence district boun- 
dary. Where a lot is divided by a district boundary, use of the lot 
within another district may be used to comply with the rear and side 
screening requirements as set forth in this by-law. Screening shall 
provide a year-round buffer between properties and, where plant 
materials are utilized, shall be species appropriate to the climate 
and terrain of the property. 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Zoning) is approved, the motion incor- 
porating Subsection E. second paragraph, shall be changed to include the 
following nine words at the beginning of the second paragraph: 

"Except in the Planned Commercial and Limited Industrial Districts " 

By Special Permit, the Zoning Board of Appeals may approve an 
alternative screening including alternative height, setback and/or 
location thereof, unless the principal use is subject to a Special 
Permit issued by the Planning Board or is subject to site plan review, 
in which case the Planning Board may approve by Special Permit any 
alternative screening. In considering an alternative screening the 
Zoning Board of Appeals or the Planning Board, as applicable, may con- 
sider approval of such alternative screening or approval of an alter- 
native height, setback or location thereof only if the applicant 
submits to the Board a landscape plan, prepared and stamped by a 
registered professional landscape architect, for the entire lot. 

-69- 



***************************************************************************** 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the motion 
incorporating Subsection E. shall include a new third paragraph as follows: 
"In the Planned Commercial and Limited Industrial Districts, a 
landscape and screening plan shall be provided for the entire site. 
The landscape plan shall be provided for the entire site. The 
landscape plan shall provide for adequate screening as necessary for 
the street and abutting lots. Such screening shall consist of densely 
planted evergreen shrubs, trees, and/or berms which form an opaque 
barrier. " 
**************************************************************************** 

An existing natural screening on a lot having a non-conforming use 
(either principal or accessory), shdll not be removed without a 
variance from the Board of Appeals." ; 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Stanley Bornstein moved that the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich be amended as presented in Article 7 of the Warrant for the October 22, 
1990 Special Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and 
the Town Moderator, and is incorporated herein by reference, with the 
following changes: In all Alternative sections, which reference the Route 
One Corridor Zoning and are designated by starred areas, "Article 4" is enu- 
merated as "Article 2". 

Seconded. Planning Board, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unani- 
mously recommended. Motion passed on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich" to allow for conversion of existing dwellings into shared 
elderly/congregate homes, containing up to five living quarters in addition 
to a caretaker's living quarters. The following actions are required: 

(1) Amending " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS " by adding the following defini- 
tion: 

"SHARED ELDERLY HOUSING: A building designed or occupied as a resi- 
dence containing up to five (5) living quarters for residents, at 
least one per living quarters must be sixty (60) years in age or 
older. In addition, up to one (1) living quarters for caretaker or 
household support services may be provided. Within this type of 
housing, a maximum of two kitchens shall be allowed." ; 

(2) Amending " SECTION V. USE REGULATIONS D. Table of Use Regulation s," by 
inserting the following category after "Multi -family dwelling" 

and before "Tourist Home": 



PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

RRA RRB IR 

"Shared Elderly Housing SPB - SPB 



-70- 



Planning Board and Board of Selectmen unanimously support, Finance Committee 
unanimously against. Ken Savoie said the board felt it was a necessary step 
in promoting affordable housing. Nancy Carter Harrington, Director of the 
Hamilton Housing Authority, said it doesn't address aff ordabi 1 ity. Mr. 
Savoie said the Planning Board did not set rents for intown residents and 
this was one way to share the rent in larger homes. Stanley Bornstein said 
this had nothing to do with low income housing. Carl Gardner asked why the 
Finance Committee was against the article, and Bill Craft stated that the 
Committee had not heard from the social agencies. 

Moderator James Grimes ruled "out of order" the definition of "living quar- 
ters" in the motion. 

Pat McNally urged the Town to vote in favor. Bette Siegel moved for indefi- 
nite postponement. The motion carried by unanimous voice vote for indefinite 
postponement . 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Ipswich" t>y 

1) inserting in SECTION V. D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS, WITHIN THE TABLE 
itself under the category "Accessory Use" the following line: 



RRA RRB IR B I 
"ACCESSORY USE 
Accessory Dwelling Unit - - SBA-^ - " ; 

********************** **********************^ 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the motion 

shall incorporate the following additions to SECTION V.D.: 

RRC PC LI 

"ACCESSORY USE 

Accessory Dwelling Unit - - " 
**************************** *************^ 

and by inserting Footnote 17 into the TABLE: 

17. For the purposes of providing small additional dwelling units to 
rent without adding to the number of buildings in the Town or 
substantially altering the appearance of the Town, of enabling 
owners of single family dwellings larger than required for their 
present needs to share space and the burdens of homeownership, the 
Board may grant a special permit for one additional dwelling unit in 
a single family dwelling for which an occupancy permit was issued 
prior to January 1, 1990, or, if no such permit was issued, which 
was legally occupied as a single family dwelling prior to such date, 
provided that all of the following conditions are met: 

a. The area of the lot on which the single family dwelling is 
located shall not be less than 10,000 square feet in an IR zone. 

b. The dwelling unit shall be located within the single family 
dwelling as it existed on January 1, 1990; 



-71- 



***************************************************************************** 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the motion 
incorporating amendments to SECTION V.D. shall be changed to include the 
following additions: 

RRC PC LI 

"Shared Elderly Housing SPB 
**************************************************************************** 

(3) Amending "SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS" by adding 
the following items: 

"DISTRICT USE MIN.LOT MIN.LOT MIN.LOT MINIMUM YARDS MAX BLDG. MAX OPEN 
AREA WIDTH FRONT FR . SIDE RR . AREA SPACE 

RRA & SHARED 43,560 190 50 50 40 30 20 50 
RRB ELDERLY 
HOUSING 

**************************************************************************** 

In the event Article 4 (Route One Corridor Zoning) is approved, the motion 

shall incorporate "RRC" within the subsection. 
••••••••A******************************************************************* 



IR SHARED 10,000 90 50 20 10 20 40 30 
ELDERLY 
HOUSING"; 



(4) Amending "SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS, 
Section A. Parking Requirements , #3. which presently reads: 

"3. Hospital, convalescent, nursing home - one (1) space for each 
two (2) beds" by changing to read as follows: 

"3. Hospital, convalescent, nursing home and shared elderly housing 
one (1) space for each two (2) beds" ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Ken Savoie moved that the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich be 
amended as presented in Article 8 of the Warrant for the October 22, 1990 
Special Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the 
Town Moderator and is incorporated herein by reference, with the following 
changes: 

1) In all Alternative sections, which reference the Route One Corridor 
Zoning and are designated by starred areas, "Article 4" is renumerated as 
"Article 2"; 

2) Amend "Section III. (Definitions) by adding the following definition: 
"Living Quarters: a portion of a building established for residence of up to 
two persons. Said areas shall be established within a building, with the 
intent of said spaces to share common living and kitchen facilities." 

-72- 



c. Tne dwelling unit shall be 
dwelling and shall occupy no mo 
area (as of January 1, 1990) of 
of any garage, shed, or similar 
to the single family dwellings; 

d. The accessory dwelling unit 
area of 350 square feet; 

e. No more than one such dwell 
single family dwelling; 

f . No more than minimum exteri 
single family dwelling; 

g. Either the dwelling unit or 
regularly occupied by an owner 
h. The single family dwelling 
comply with the parking require 
i. The single family dwelling 
comply with any applicable Boar 
j. Floor plans of the dwelling 
with a site plan showing the lo 
on the lot, shall be filed with 
at the time of application to t 
k . Application for a building 
occupancy shall be made to the 
occupancy shall be allowed prio 
use and occupancy by the Bui 1 d i 



a use incidental to the single family 
re than one-third of the gross floor 
the single family dwelling exclusive 
structure of accessory use attached 

shall have a minimum gross floor 

ing unit shall exist within the 

or alterations shall be made to the 



the sing 
of the lo 
and acces 
ments in 
and acces 
d of Heal 

unit and 
cation of 

the Bui 1 
he Board; 
permit or 
Bui 1 ding 
r to the 
ng Inspec 



le family dwelling shall be 

t; 

sory dwelling unit shall 

the Zoning By-Law; 

sory dwelling unit shall 

th requirements; 

the single family dwelling, 

the single family dwelling 
ding Inspector prior to or 

and 

certificate of use and 
Inspector, and no use or 
issuance of a certificate of 
tor; 



or to take any other action relative thereto. 



Stanley Bornstein moved that action under Article 9 of the October 22, 1990 
Special Town Meeting be postponed indefinitely. Motion carried on a voice 
vote . 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 90, Section 22B(b)-(k) inclusive, relative to the 
disposal of abandoned motor vehicles; or to take any other action relative 

thereto . 

Police Chief Charles Surpitski moved that the Town vote to accept the provi- 
sions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 90, Section 22B(b)-(k) inclu- 
sive, relative to the disposal of abandoned motor vehicles. 

Chief Surpitski spoke in favor of Article 10 to aid the Police Department in 
dealing with abandoned motor vehicles. Board of Selectmen and Finance 
Committee unanimously recommend. The motion passed on a simple majority 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich", CHAPTER IV. GENERAL PROVISIONS ON BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND 
OFFICERS, Section 7. Establishment of Fees , by adding to the end thereof the 
following sentence. 



-73- 



"This by-law shall not be applicable to any sums, charges, and/or fees 
authorized by the General Laws to be set and/or collected by any other 
Town board or official, including, but not limited to, the Building 
Inspector, Board of Health, Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Town Clerk, Treasurer/Collector, Conservation Commission, Historical 
Commission, Harbormaster, Fire Chief, Police Chief, Town Manager, and/or 
Library Trustees." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town 
of Ipswich, CHAPTER IV. "Section 7. Establishment of Fees " as presented in 
Article 11 of the warrant for the October 22, 1990 Special Town Meeting, a 
copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town Moderator and is 
incorporated herein by reference. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, "CHAPTER XVIII, Section 4: Filing Procedure ", by adding the 
following three paragraphs to the end thereof: 

"The Commission is authorized to require the applicant to pay the reason 
able costs and expenses borne by the Commission for reasonable expert 
engineering and consultant services deemed desirable by the Commission 
to review the Notice of Intent and/or the Request for Determination of 
Applicability, up to a maximum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00). 
Said payment can be required at any time in the deliberations prior to 
a final decision being rendered. Said services may include, but are not 
limited to wetland resource area surveys and delineations, wetland 
resource area reports, hydrogeological and drainage analysis, wildlife 
evaluations, shellfish surveys, and environmental/land use law. 

The Commission is authorized to require said fee when the Notice of 
Intent and/or the Request for Determination of Applicability proposes any 
of the following: alteration of 500 square feet or more of a coastal or 
inland wetland resource area: 50 linear feet or greater of bank altera- 
tion to an inland or coastal waterway: 500 square feet or greater altera- 
tion to the buffer zone: alteration of greater than 500 square feet of 
land under a water body or the ocean discharge of any pollutants into or 
contributing to surface or groundwater or the wetland resource area or 
buffer zone: and/or the construction of any detention or retention basin 
or water control structure. 

Said fee shall be paid by the applicant to the Town of Ipswich into a 
professional service appropriation account of the Ipswich Conservation 
Commission set up for this purpose which may be drawn upon by the 
Commission for services approved by the Commission at a public hearing. 
Any unused portion of said fee shall be returned by the Commission to 
the applicant within forty-five (45) calendar days of written request 
by the applicant, unless the Commission decides in a public meeting 



-74- 



that other action is not necessary. Any applicant aggrieved by the 
imposition of, or the size of, the fee, or any act related thereto, may 
appeal according to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Richard Nylen, Jr., moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws of 
the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XVIII, " Section 4: Filing Procedures " as pre- 
sented in Article 12 of the Warrant for the October 22, 1990 Special Town 
Meeting, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town 
Moderator and is incorporated herein by reference. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "General By-Laws of the Town of 

Ipswich," "CHAPTER II. ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF THE TOWN MEETINGS, 

(1) in Section 1. Annual Town Meeting " by deleting from the first sentence of 

subsection (a) thereof the following: 

"The Annual Town Meeting of the Town shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on the 
first Monday in April." ; 

and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"The Annual Town Meeting of the Town shall be held on a date and at a 
time as specified by the Board of Selectmen in the Warrant, within the 
first seven calendar days of the month of April." ; 

and (2) in " Section 2. Special Town Meetings ", subsection (a), by deleting 
the first sentence thereof in its entirety; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that action on Article 13 be postponed indefinitely. Motion 
carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to accept certain easement interests in certain 
parcels of real estate shown as "Proposed 50' Access and Utility Easement" on 
the plan recorded at Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 204, 
Plan 58; and "Access and Utility Easement" on the plan recorded at said 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 212, Plan 79; said parcels of real estate run 
from Intervale Way to Fox Run Road in the neighborhood known as "Appleton 
Estates" in the Town; the nature and extent of said easement interests are to 
be determined by the Board of Selectmen at their discretion; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to accept certain easement interests in 
certain parcels of real estate shown as "Proposed 50' Access and Utility 
Easement" on the plan recorded as Essex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 204, Plan 58; and "Access and Utility Easement" on the plan 
recorded at said registry of deeds, Plan Book 212, Plan 79; said parcels of 
real estate run from Intervale Way to Fox Run Road in the neighborhood known 
as "Appleton Estates" in the Town; the nature and extent of said easement 
interests are to be determined by the Board of Selectmen at their discretion. 

-75- 



Mr. Engel explained the "Cart Path" which connects from Intervale Way to 
Fox Run Road in the Appleton Estates Development. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
unanimously on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the real estate (commonly known as the 
Town Wharf area) conveyed to the Town by deed of the Notre Dame Training 
School, Inc., dated September 6, 1961, and recorded at Essex South District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 4796, Page 297, in accordance with the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 40, #3 and/or Chapter 40, #14; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Bill George moved that the Town vote to accept the real estate (commonly 
known as the town wharf area) conveyed to the Town by deed of the Notre Dame 
Training School, Inc., dated September 6, 1961, and recorded at Essex South 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 4796, Page 297, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 33 and/or Chapter 
40, Section #14. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the layout, alteration or relocation of 
portions of Avery Street and Mitchell Road, as voted by the Board of Selectmen on 
July 30, 1990, as recorded at Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Book 10377, 
Page 534, and as shown on "Layout Plan for a Portion of Avery Street, Ipswich 
(Essex Co.) Massachusetts, . . . dated March 1989" by James E. Chase, Town 
Engineer, recorded at said Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 264 Plan 54, a copy 
having been filed with the Town Clerk, in accordance with the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 82 #23; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Bill Walton moved that the Town vote to accept the layout, alteration or 
relocation of Avery Street and Mitchell Road, as voted by the Board of 
Selectmen on July 30, 1990, as recorded at Essex South District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 10377, Page 534, as shown on "Layout Plan for a Portion of Avery 

Street, Ipswich (Essex County) Massachusetts dated March 1989" by James E. 

Chase, Town Engineer, recorded at said Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 264, Plan 
54, a copy having been filed with the Town Clerk in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 82, #23. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously recom- 
mended. Motion carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to accept under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 82, the following public ways, all located off Jeffrey's 
Neck Road .in the area known as Jeffrey's Neck Shores, substantially as shown 
on Assessors Map 22D: Ocean Drive; Crestwood Road; and Perriwinkle Lane; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Bill George moved that action on Article 17 be postponed indefinitely. 
Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 



-76- 



ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to state that the sense of the Town Meeting is 
to instruct both the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee not to grant 
any increases in total compensation of more than three percentum to any Town 
employee without exception, for fiscal year 1992, beginning July 1, 1991; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town Meeting vote that it is the sense of the 
Town Meeting that the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee are hereby 
instructed not to grant any increase in total compensation of more than three 
percentum to any Town employee, without exception, for fiscal year 1992, 
begi nni ng July 1, 1991. 

Board of Selectmen recommended 3-2, Finance Committee opposed 6-2. Jamie Fay 
spoke in opposition to a 3% cap. James Engel said we were already under the 
21 cap and urged to vote against. School Committee 5-1 in opposition to this 
article. After some discussion, the question was moved. To move the 
question was carried on a 2/3 voice vote. The main motion failed by majority 
voice vote. 



The meeting was adjourned at 10:15 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by 
publication at least seven days prior to the time for holding said meeting in 
a newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of 
Ipswich . 

Given unto our hands this 1st day of October in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
Wil 1 iam E. George 
Charles J. Wayne 
Patrick J. McNally 
Wil 1 iam I . Walton 



-77- 



******** 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
James R. Engel , Chairman 

Calendar year 1990 saw changes in the makeup of the Board of Selectmen. 
Following the resignation of Thomas Elliott in late 1989, a special election 
returned Charles Wayne to the Board. In the annual election in April, James R. 
Engel was returned to the Board for his second term and Robert Leet lost his 
seat to newcomer Patrick McNally. Two major issues faced the Board of Selectmen 
during calendar year 1990: Proposition 2h overrides and a major reorganization 
of the municipal side of Town government. 

As the budget process developed in early 1990, the limitations of Proposition 2\ 
forced the enumeration of a number of cutbacks on the municipal side designed to 
produce a budget consistent with these limitations. As a result, both the 
schools and the municipal government presented overrides totalling approximately 
$1,000,000. Of these overrides, approximately $500,000 were authorized by the 
voters, the majority of that being for continuation of curbside trash pickup. 

As promised to the voters at the Annual Town Meeting, a reorganization of the 
municipal side of Town government was initiated late in the calendar year. The 
reorganization has as its objectives: 1) an improvement in the delivery of ser- 
vices to the community; 2) a more streamlined, responsive, and responsible organ- 
ization; 3) a decrease in the number of direct reports to the Town Manager; and 
4) cost savings by elimination of duplication of efforts. This task was ini- 
tiated in late 1990 and will continue toward completion in mid to late 1991. 

A major initiative in the area of municipal waste was accomplished by the Solid 
Waste Committee. A voluntary recycling program was initiated near the end of the 
year emphasizing drop-off of recyclable goods at a temporary facility located in 
the Town Hall parking lot and supplemented by a permanent drop-off facility at 
the transfer station on Town Farm Road. A critical examination of the possibi- 
lity of town-wide curbside recycling has been initiated. 

Operation of the Water Department proceeded smoothly through the second anniver- 
sary of the Water Treatment Plant with no unanticipated technical or financial 
problems. Again, the department was able to provide this service without the 
need for rate changes. The pilot water meter replacement program was initiated 
with the installation of a number of remotely read meters and an evaluation of 
the telephone dial-up method for meter reading. The results to date have been 
most encouraging. Replacement of lead pipe in the system has proceeded with 
vigor including the periodic testing of selected sites in town for levels of 
lead in the drinking water. This testing assures the department that the 
treatment processes are achieving the objective of reducing the amount of 
leaching within the system. Within the Sewer Department the permitting process 
for the reed system for sludge disposal has proceeded smoothly, although 
somewhat slowly. The composting facility (a required backup facility to the 
reed system) was funded at Town Meeting and will be fully permitted and opera- 
tional in mid-1991. 

Of major note within the Electric Department was the beginning of the commercial 
operation of the Seabrook Station nuclear power plant in which Ipswich has an 
equity position through its participation in certain programs of the 
Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company. While not without contro- 
versy, the operation of the plant provides Ipswich with generating capacity and 

-78- 



power in exchange for its equity commitment. The scheduled addition of 
generating capacity at the municipally owned plant on High Street has been pur- 
posely delayed in response to a number of issues including a softening of 
growth in consumption and issues associated with obtaining sufficient natural 
gas to operate the generator within cost and ecological limits that the 
Commissioners have as targets. Through 1990, decreased sales and the loss of 
Rowley as a wholesale customer have adversely affected the profitability of the 
department. 

******** 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

Nineteen-ni nety was a transitional year for the Town of Ipswich in terms of its 
finances, its use of technology, and its structure of municipal government. 
After nine years of having successfully avoided the need for overrides to cover 
operating expenses, Town Meeting was asked and approved referenda questions to 
fund schools, public safety, and refuse collection services through taxes in 
excess of the levy limit. Compounding the fiscal uncertainties facing and com- 
munity as the economy continued in decline, tax collections and user fee collec- 
tions fell. As in 1989, again in this past year the legislature cut our local 
aid during the summer months, after our budget process was long completed. 

This fiscal adversity provided impetus to complete a long-sought management 
tool: a detailed projection of cash flow of the Town's operations for the 
balance of the calendar year, thence extended to the end of FY 1991 . The use of 
microcomputers began to blossom in Town Hall operations during this past year. 
Use of spreadsheet and word processing applications became commonplace. Some 
financial reports, previously done manually if at all, were produced on PC's. 
Audits for FY1987 and 1988 were completed and submitted to the Town. Cost con- 
tainment efforts were undertaken, notably in the accident/casualty and health 
insurance 1 i nes . 

Town staff have worked hard to help define how our local government should be 
reorganized, to identify which services and procedures need either to be 
improved or dropped. For example, a short-term contract was approved for refuse 
disposal services, wherein the Town now pays a per-ton charge for tonnage 
actually tipped, rather than a lump sum price per year. The feasibility of 
starting a recycling program was studied, and a pilot program started in the 
fall, at the transfer station and behind Town Hall. The Forestry Division was 
closed as of June 30th, and some services contracted on an as-needed basis, 
others eliminated. Work on reorganization continued through the close of the 
year, with the intention of its implementation in ensuing months. 

There were accomplishments of a visible nature or which soon will be apparent. 
The Library air conditioning project was completed, and it was well under 
budget. The Great Neck playground received a major upgrade in equipment. A 
portion of East Street was reconditioned, including the replacement of lead 
water services. And a drainage problem was corrected in the Argil la/Heartbreak 
Road area. Design and permitting approvals were completed for the sewage sludge 
composting project; progress on design of the phragmites reed technology/sewage 
sludge disposal facility was stalled by delays in reviews by the State D.E.P. 

Thanks are extended for the help and cooperation of all who have shared in 
enduring this past year's travails. 

-79- 



******** 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry W. Leno, Jr., Animal Control Officer 

The Animal Control Department continues to receive, investigate, and resolve 
issues involving the laws regarding dogs. These and other issues involving 
responsible pet ownership and control continue to occupy a great deal of time. 

There were several improvements made to the Animal Shelter on Fowler's Lane. 
New electrical wiring was installed which will allow the use of a dehumidifier 
This should allow for the greater comfort of all the animals that are housed 
there. Many of the existing dry wall petitions were found to be rotting and 
were replaced. A fund raising effort being conducted by the Ipswich Humane 
Group will eventually be used for the overall expansion of the facility. This 
is badly needed and once completed will serve the Town well. 

T^e Department continues to be blessed with an active group of volunteers. 

Without their support the quality of animal life within the community would be 

in further jeopardy. The majority of these efforts are without recognition or 
fanfare. They certainly deserve both. 

A part time employee to care for the animals housed at the pound was added to 
the department. This person is responsible for this activity on holidays and 
the vacation period of the animal control officer. 

STATISTICS FOR 1990 



Complaints received 3409 

Complaints investigated 3191 

Dog bites 26 

Animals killed by cars 286 

Animals killed by dogs 4 

Dogs picked up 239 



Dogs & cats euthanized 2 

Dogs returned to owners 186 

Fel ine complaints 629 

Citations issued 136 

Licenses issued 1221 

Animals adopted 81 



******** 

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property January 1, 1990, 
was $1,042,462,993. 



The valuation of the Town by class is 

Class I Residential 
Class II Open Space 
Class III Commercial 
Class IV Industrial 

Personal Property 



$915,205,300 

67,456,867 
48,329,600 
11,471,226 



87.79% 

6.47% 
4.64% 
1.10% 



The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 1991 was $10.05/thousand for all property classes 

-80- 



******** 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Joseph Ferruzzi , Inspector of Buildings 

The following report represents the total Building Department permit activity 
for the calendar year 1990, including plumbing and gas permit inspection acti- 
vity. 

Gross Total All Building/Occupancy Permits 689 

Total New Buildings 54 

Total Miscellaneous Permits 381 

Total Alteration/Addition Permits 109 

Total Occupancy Permits 116 

Total Demolition Permits 29 

Total Value of All Construction $10,738,520 

Total Fees Collected (689 Building Permits) 64,742 

Total Fees Collected (682 Plumbing Permits) 9,692 

Total Fees Collected (692 Gas Permits) 6,518 

Total Fees Collected (39 Inspection Certificates) 1,731 

Grand Total Fees Collected 82,683 

******** 

CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPARTMENT 
James E. Graff urn Superintendent 

General grounds work was performed in all of the Town's nine cemeteries and 
seven parks. 

Site preparation for the new playground structure at the Great Neck Playground 
was accomplished by the Parks Department as well as assisting in the installa- 
tion of the new equipment. 

Twenty-eight tons of infield material was spread on the ballfields at Bialek 
Park. 

The Parks crew spread fourteen yards of loam and dispensed seed on the diamond 
area of the baseball field at Bialek Park. 

Continued clearing of a section of the Highland Cemetery for future use is 
ongoi ng. 

There were ninety-two interments in the year of 1990. 

There were one three-grave lot, four two-grave lots, and two single-grave lots 
awarded to Veterans. 

Seven two-grave lots, five four-grave lots, and three one-grave lots were sold, 
all with perpetual care. 



There were nine government markers set, fourteen corner posts sets installed, 
twenty-six monument foundations poured, and thirty-nine markers set. 

Chapel Tents $1,750.00 

Sale of Lots 5,100.00 

Perpetual Care 3,900.00 

Foundations 6,178.25 

Interments 24,508.00 

Total $41,508.25 

******** 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

John T. Clogston, Assistant Director 

The year 1990 was an uneventful year for Ipswich Civil Defense. There were no 

incidents of a major concern involving this department such as natural disasters 

or incidents created by man. However, the department has continued to train and 
prepare for such incidents. 

Auxiliary police, under the direction of Capt. George Desrocher and Police Chief 
Charles Surpitski, continue to meet monthly and train for the unexpected. 

The Emergency Operating Center (E.O.C.) staff and its director continue to meet 
every Monday night at its office located in the Middle School. This department is 
still active in the North Shore Civil Defense Council which meets once a month in 
different communities. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the departments for their help 
and cooperation during this past year. Again, I make an appeal to the citizens of 
Ipswich - Unite, get involved in your Civil Defense Department. It's people 
helping people, and that's what keeps our country strong! 

••*•**** 

COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
William M. Varrell, Chairman 

For the first nine months of 1990, it appeared that it would be an uneventful 
year for the rail committee. However, inspite of our efforts, for the first 
time in many years we lost a small part of our railroad service. As of the end 
of October, the first Saturday train to Boston and the last Saturday evening 
shuttle from Beverly were discontinued. 

The Rail Committee, assisted by several other local commuters, very actively 
participated in the hearing process at the time the railroad first announced 
proposed cuts and consolidations throughout the system. As a result of our 
activities, Ipswich had the only train cut that were replaced by alternate 
public transportation. However, this experimental bus furnished by the Cape Ann 
Transit Authority never attracted enough riders to justify continuation, and 
after two months was also cancelled. At the time the morning train was can- 
celled, more than a dozen Ipswich riders were using it each trip; but the 
deteriorating State economy with its slow down in business activity and the 
historical fact that local commuters have generally rejected substitute busses 
could not be overcome. 



-82- 



On the brighter side of the past year's railroad activities, once again the Rail 
Committee maintained and expanded the flowers at the station. They required 
almost nightly watering during the July dry spell, and the bush purchased with 
profits from last year's railroad celebration was run over at least twice by the 
eight-wheel truck that also knocked down the Topsfield Road signals and the 
parking lot sign. However, the petunias thrived in the rock hard soil and 
brightened what could otherwise have become a shabby downtown corner. 

The Monday through Friday volume of Ipswich rail commuters remains strong, but 
we have been advised by T management to expect further cuts in weekend service. 
We should be able to maintain our strong core service, but local residents must 
not take rail service for granted. If they want to maintain what we have, they 
must participate at hearings when further cuts are proposed and continue to use 
the service whenever possible. 

******** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

Even with the financial problems of 1990, the Conservation Commission's caseload 
turned out to be busier than the last two years, with the anticipated lull not 
occurring until November. The following is a list of the 1990 activity compared 
with 1988 and 1989. 

1988 1989 1990 

Notices of Intent: 
Orders of Conditions: 
Enforcement Orders: 
Determinations of Applicability: 
Certificates of Compliance: 

The new Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law was passed at the April 1990 Town 
Meeting and went into effect on September 1, 1990. One significant section of 
the By-Law gives the Conservation Commission jurisdiction within the 150-foot 
ACEC area (Area of Critical Environmental Concern). Another section enables the 
Commission to levy fines for violations. A final section of the By-Law was 
clarified and amended which passed at the October 1990 Special Town Meeting. 

Governor Dukakis signed three significant environmental bills at the end of the 
year, two of them being of great benefit to conservation commissions: The 
Endangered Species Act, which provides protection for over 400 species of plants 
and animals not protected under federal statutes; and a bill that gives local 
conservation commissions the right to enter private property to investigate 
violations of the State's Wetlands Protection Act which reinstates authority 
stripped by a ruling of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 1988. 

Records were broken in 1990 when the Commission held site inspections for six 
Saturdays in a row, one lasting a total of seven hours. It was an indication 
that more and more people are becoming aware of the importance of wetlands and 
the environment in general. 

The Commission said good-bye, with many thanks, to Bob Porter and Arthur Knight, Jr 
in 1990. Taking their places were Wayne Castonguay and Joseph Pecoraro, two 
more hard-working and dedicated members. 

-83- 



30 


24 


37 


29 


20 


33 


6 


28 


26 


7 


7 


17 


6 


16 


10 



******** 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
Winfred Hardy, Chairman 

This year has been a yery fine year for our Council. We have maintained our 
Blood Pressure Program each and e^ery Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 
This has continued for the last ten years due to the benevolence of the trained 
nurse who conducts it. 

A reception was held in December for Hazel Hull to wish her well in her retire- 
ment and to express appreciation for her years of service as hostess at 
the Drop-In Center. 

Mary Ruest, our morning hostess, started a choral group which visits the various 
Rest Homes and Day Care Centers and entertains them with their music. It evi- 
dently is quite a hit for we get numerous letters and calls from the people who 
enjoyed them. Mrs. Ruest has many other programs that are enjoyed by the 
elderly that participate in the activities at the Drop-In-Center. 

Within the last two years, we have developed an Outreach Service developed by 
Diane Mitchell which we have lacked previously. This service is conducted 
through telephone and personal contact and has been quite helpful for the 
elderly who are housebound. Mrs. Mitchell has also organized a Friend of the 
Elderly Auxilary which should be completely organized early this spring. 

******** 

ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Donald R. Stone, Sr., Manager 

In 1990, we saw an increase in the number of electrical services of 89, bringing 
the total number of residential, municipal, commercial and industrial customers 
to 5,895. Generation at the Power Plant was 5,076,650 KWH, a decrease of 33% 
from the all-time high set in 1989 of 7,573,060. The 1990 peak was also lower 
than the previous year (19,775 in 1990 vs. 22,060 in 1989). The 1990 peak was 
reached on January 22, 1990. Distribution continued a maintenance and upgrade 
program that has been established over the last seven years. In 1990, Ipswich 
sold 75,634,297 KWH, a decrease of 20,749,191 KWH from 1989 sales. Allowing for 
the loss of Rowley, sales still showed a decrease of 675,171 KWH in the residen- 
tial, municipal, commercial and industrial classes (approximately 1%). 

The annual study of municipal electric departments in Massachusetts showed that 
our residential rates still remain among the lowest in the state. 

******** 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Willard Maker, Jr., Acting Chief 

The Department retired two employees and had one firefighter resign, in addition 
to having the Chief and one Lieutenant on long-term disability leave. The 
current staff consists of twelve full-time and twenty-nine call personnel. 
Shifts are down from four to three persons, creating a strain on our ability to 

-84- 



complete work tasks and respond to incidents. Our new pumper was placed in ser- 
vice in August. It carries six persons, 1000 gallons of water, 2000 feet of 
water supply hose, four attack lines, and lighting. 

Department personnel attended 435 hours of Fire Academy training in addition to 
training conducted by the Department. 

The Department is continuing the task of enforcing the Town's street number by- 
law, seeing that every building displays a proper number. We are establishing a 
completed list of fire hydrant locations to assist firefighters in locating a 
hydrant when responding to fires. A program of testing fire hose as recommended 
by the NFPA was begun. 

Lieutenant Dennis Durrell is continuing an aggressive fire safety education and 
prevention program. This includes the annual open house attended by hundreds of 
residents, education programs for elementary and preschool children, and 
inspections . 

The Department inspected 142 oil burner installations, 188 buildings, 196 smoke 
detector installations, 10 L.P. gas installations, and 57 new occupancies. The 
Department responded to 672 incidents, 43 structure fires, 78 outside fires, 19 
motor vehicle fires, 79 motor vehicle accidents, 124 medical calls, 80 investi- 
gations, 25 hazardous materials spills, 118 false or accidental alarms, and 100 
service calls. The Department's firefighters did an admirable job controlling 
fires which is demonstrated by the fact that all fires were controlled quickly 
and no major fires resulted. 

The Fire Department received $5993 in revenue. 



******** 



HALL-HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Chairman 

The year 1990 was a year of great introspection. Given that it was a year in 
which money seemed to be in short supply, a great deal of thought was given 
regarding creative ways for it to be used in order to get the building restored 

Actually, it reminded me of the 1800's when Mary Hall lived in this house and 
ran a small shop downstairs with living quarters upstairs. Like all the other 
shopkeepers along that street, she was struggling for her livelihood. At that 
time, Ipswich was feeling the repercussions of the War of 1818. It's as though 
today we are experiencing a similar situation. 

A fair amount of money is still needed to finish the interior of the house. In 
the fall of this year, we did launch a fund-raising campaign and were able to 
raise $2,000.00 which will go towards the first phase of interior restoration. 
We thank all of you who contributed to this event. 

Thanks for all your support. 

-85- 



******** 



HARBORS 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

David R. Brouil lette, Assistant Harbormaster 

The Harbor Department addressed a number of perplexing problems over the past 
year. Mooring fees were increased to $2 per foot and remain competitive with 
surrounding areas. A comprehensive parking and traffic flow plan for the wharf 
and the neighborhood was formulated and approved by the Board of Selectmen. 
After recommendation by the Harbormaster, the Board also approved the charging 
of launching fees at the Town owned wharf. These were instituted during the 
past boating season and were tremendously successful. A Dockmaster was hired to 
monitor the traffic at the wharf and collect the fees. By the institution of 
these fees, the burden of running the Harbor Department's services were more 
evenly shifted to all boaters. 

The safety of the various users of the waterways continues to be the primary 
focus of the Department. We provide a visible law enforcement presence on the 
water. Additionally, we were fortunate to be awarded a Department of the 
Environment Division of Law Enforcement grant to promote boater safety. This 
allowed the department to increase the hours of patrol as well as the number of 
officers assigned. 

As the harbor becomes more crowded, the proper management and location assign- 
ment of moorings takes on greater significance. We continue to serve the public 
in this regard and as much as possible grant reasonable requests of placement. 

The Department and its resources assist and is assisted by other local, state 
and federal law enforcement agencies. This is also true of boater organiza- 
tions, groups, individuals, and the managers of Crane Beach. We attempt to 
identify problems, educate individuals in proper waterway uses, and allow for use 
while minimizing adverse environmental impacts. Such efforts and coordination 
must continue. 

The Department responded to many persons in distress on the water. Oftentimes, 
we were assisted or assisted other emergency organizations such as the United 
States Coast Guard or the Environmental Police of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. In all such situations, it is our boat and personnel which is 
most readily available and generally reaches the area prior to other responding 
units. Members of the boating community assist one another as well, but many of 
these calls are received in inclement weather when there is not a great deal of 
other boater traffic. 

******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Domenic A. Badolato, Jr., Health Agent 

The following is the yearly report of the activities of the Health Department 
under Domen-ic A. Badolato, Jr., for the year 1990. 

LICENSES AND PERMITS ISSUED 

Food Service 72 

Retail Food 10 

Disposal Works Construction Permits 66 

-86- 



Septic Haulers 13 

Septic Installers 37 

Swimmi ng Pool s 2 

Recreational Camps 2 

HEALTH INSPECTIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS 

Food Service Inspections 206 

Full Housing Inspections 33 

No Heat Complaints 2 

Trash & Debris Complaints 19 

Insect & Rodent Complaints 16 

Perc Tests 75 

Septic Plans Reviewed 97 

Septic System Inspections 223 

Referrals from Building Inspector 18 

Referrals from Fire Department 6 

Referrals from Police Department 13 

Swimming Pool Inspections 4 

Water Testing 36 

Dye Testing 96 

Conferences Attended 15 

Health Complaints (Misc.) Investigated 73 

Recycling Meetings 42 

FEES COLLECTED FOR VARIOUS SERVICES 

Food Permits (Retail Food, Catering, Ice Cream, 

Bakeries, Mobile Food Service) $3,955 
Individual Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems 

(Perc Tests, Plan Approval, Septic Installers, 

Septic Haulers) 9,140 
Miscellaneous (Keeping Pigs, Ice Machines, 

Temporary Catering, Recreational Camps) 977 

Swimming Pools 20 

Total $14,112 



•••***** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Donald Curiale, Chairman 

The year 1990 brought many changes to the Ipswfch Historical Commission. The 
Commission members became more acquainted and familiar with the 1987 Demolition 
By-Law. Both the public of Ipswich and the Commission learned that new laws 
bring new changes. Cooperation, dedication, and hard work was the order of the 
year for Commission members. 

The Commission concluded its "Comprehensive Nineteenth Century Industrial and 
Ethnic Survey" with Christine Beard as historical consultant. The survey focu- 
ses on the history of the early mills, their locations, products, workers, and 
housing. As a result, parts of the industrial area have been recommended for 
the National Register of Historic Places. The Commission will be releasing 
information from the survey including bi-weekly newspaper articles in the 
Ipswich Chronicle. 

-87- 



In the spring of 1990, Mary Conley resigned as chairperson of the Commission. 
The members would like to publicly express their deep gratitude to Mary for all 
her fine work. In this light, the Historical Commission created a new 
preservation award - The Mary Conley Preservation Award - to be given once a 
year to that individual and/or property owner who has voluntarily achieved an 
outstanding preservation act or acts. In addition, a fund was established to 
design and to install a Choate Bridge sign in the spring of 1991. The 
Commission thanks all those who created, established, and donated to the funds. 

In keeping one of its goals of preserving the architectural and structural 
integrity of Ipswich, the Commission created the Historic District Study 
Committee. Chaired by Mr. Paul McGinley, the Committee is studying various 
public preservation methods. 

The Historical Commission expresses its appreciation to the Board of Selectmen, 
Town Manager, Town Planner, Building Inspector, and especially the townspeople 
for their moral and financial support in the past year. 

•****•** 

THE IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 
Georgina Jill Traverso, Chairman 
Jon Aaron, Co-Chairman 

The Ipswich Arts Council held a hearing on April 4, 1990, to vote on 
Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council spring grants to artists who had applied. 
Grants were awarded to the following applicants: 

The Gloucester Stage Conservatory for an original -adaption production of 
"Cinderella"; Cheryl Bonarrigo for a project in macro-photography involving 
students at the Winthrop School; Rebecca Laughlin for paintings; Mary 
Caldwell for photography; The Ipswich Theatre Ensemble for its summer theatre 
program at the high school; Rev. Bruce Arbour for a summer workshop in pup- 
petry; The United Methodist Church for a summer concert series; Claire 
Perrault for weaving; Music at Eden's Edge for a music series to which a 
number of free tickets were made available to Ipswich Senior Citizens; The 
Tri -Town Symphony Orchestra for a spring concert at LaSalette; M. Lynne 
Clarkin for an art exhibit and workshop held at the Winthrop School 

The Ipswich School Department grant proposal, submitted by Fine Arts Coordinator 
Monica Cirrito-Sheppard, received funding for PASS for students to attend the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra Youth Concerts and the Spingold Theatre. 

During Olde Ipswich Days, the Arts Council sponsored the Fourth Annual Art 
Exhibit to show the work of Ipswich artists. A total of $1,300 in prize money 
was awarded to Dianne Faissler, Pamela Wooton, Bror Hultgren, Susan Burton, 
Hideaki Miyamura, and Lesley Parker. 

A painting of Ipswich by 1988 grant recipient William Landmesser, who donated it 
to the Town, was officially accepted by the Board of Selectmen and the Trustees 
of the Ipswich Public Library and now hangs in the Public Library. 

-88- 



On October 10, 1990, the fall grants hearing was held. Grants were awarded to 
the following applicants: 

Ashley Thompson for sculpture; Lenny Cavallaro for a piano recital to be 
presented at the high school; Lia F. Gram for writing and reading of her 
work to students in high school English classes; North Shore Music Theatre 
for their "Theatreventure" program for young people. The Ipswich Schools 
were again given a grant for PASS funding for students to attend the Boston 
Symphony Youth Concerts and the North Shore Music Theatre. 

******** 

IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Sara S. O'Connor, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority has moved into phase II of the Linebrook Road 
Housing complex. The Zoning Board of Appeals voted to grant the authority a 
Comprehensive Permit to begin the actual development of the twenty units. This 
process began in 1990. The twenty units will be duplex, triplex and quadplex. 
There will be two, three, and four bedroom units. This development will further 
aid the housing crisis we are now facing. The units will enable our young town 
families to continue to live in their own town. The Ipswich Housing Authority 
commissioners have a basic policy that town residents receive priority relative 
to housing assignments. 

Governor Michael Dukakis was in Ipswich in 1990 to present to Frederick 
Woodworth, Jr., a plaque and citation for his generous donation of property on 
Leslie Road to the Ipswich Housing Authority. The donated land will be used 
for the development of elderly and handicapped housing for low-income people. 
Ipswich residents will have priority on the housing waiting list. The former 
governor also gave the dedication speech at Cable Gardens and commended the 
Housing Authority for their part in providing a program, with State assistance, 
to help our elderly citizens with their housing needs. 

Robert Como was appointed by a joint vote of the Board of Selectmen and the 
Housing Authority to complete the term vacated by Walter Ziemlak. 

A public hearing was held at the Ipswich Housing Authority relative to the 
Linebrook Road development. State Officials listened to the testimony of town 
residents and abutters. The State ultimately ruled the Ipswich Housing 
Authority could continue development on Linebrook Road because all criteria had 
been met. 

The Ipswich Housing Authority Commissioners will continue to meet the needs of 
those who seek decent, safe, and sanitary housing as prescribed by Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 12 IB . 

The Ipswich Housing Authority Board of Commissioners is made up of Sara S. O'Connor 
Chairman, Loretta Dietch, Vice Chairman, Catherine Cecil, Arthur Weagle, and 
Robert Como. The Executive Director is Raymond Daniels, Sr. 

-89- 



******** 



LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Gaunt, Head Librarian 

Library circulation in 1990 increased 9% over the previous twelve months for a 
high of 97,611 over 1990 ' s 89,401 - an average of 7.63 per capita. Of this 
total, recreational reading accounted for approximately 50%. Audiovisual cir- 
culation represented 3,225 items of the total: videos 752, cassettes 1,848, and 
records 625. 

New items purchased for the collection: Books - 3,149, videos - 8, cassettes - 16, 
records - 2. Total collection: Books - 63,162, videos - 97, cassettes - 631, 
records - 1,545. Subscriptions to magazines and newspapers - 135; there are 306 
reels of microfilm. The Library issued 1,598 new library cards, bringing our 
total number of registered borrowers to 6,989. There were 376 visitors to the 
Archives Room. We borrowed 622 books from other libraries for Ipswich resi- 
dents, and loaned out 1,264. 

The Library's long-awaited central air conditioning became a reality on August 24th 
when the system was officially turned on. Related fencing and interior renova- 
tion in the basement level has completed the job. Other physical improvements 
included renovation of the main circulation desk, and a new shelving installa- 
tion to house the mystery collection. 

In April, Ipswich celebrated National Library Week's "Night of a Thousand Stars" 
with our own Star, Dana Hersey, in an evening of readings aloud. The Friends of 
the Library co-sponsored with the Historical Society a program titled "Fireside 
Chats: an Evening of Ipswich History" featuring informal anecdotes by prominent 
local citizens. 

The Friends, with a current membership of 250, ran their annual book sale during 
Old Ipswich Days. This highly successful fund-raiser enables the Friends to 
provide those "extras" for the library, such as passes to Boston and area 
museums. During 1990, 675 museum visits were made by Ipswich families. Much of 
the Library's video and cassette collection has been donated by the Friends. 
The Library is indeed grateful for their ongoing support. 

Thoughtful donations of books were made in memory of Hildur Ogren, John Pynchon, Sr . , 
George Soffron, Craig Wile, and Jack Soroka. The Library continues to benefit 
greatly from the volunteer efforts of 11 regular volunteers who, together, 
contribute 28 valuable hours a week toward keeping the book collection moving 
along and well maintained. 

Use of the business and law collections is significantly higher, along with 
demand for books on career changing and resume writing. Many adult students 
take advantage of the facility and its resources during morning hours. 
Telephone reference service continues to provide quick answers to requests for 
statistical information, addresses of our elected representatives, for example. 

School use of the Library has dramatically increased as emphasis on library 
research is being stressed more in the Middle School. Our pamphlet and clip- 
pings file is an invaluable source of help with questions about current social 
topics and town government, to name a couple. 

-90- 



The Children's pre-school story times, in session between October and June, and 
frequently oversubscribed, were attended by over 100 children, generating high 
circulation of books. More than 200 "sleuths" participated in the Summer 
Reading Club, "The Investigators". We hosted regular visits from Nursery 
Schools, Scout Troops, special classes and the YMCA. Special programs included 
a visit from the Speech class of the High school and Bruce Arbour's puppets. 
The ever-popular checker tournament was held during February vacation attracting 
20 registrants. There were 12 winners. Rounding out the year for Ipswich 
children 6 months to 14 years were special holiday parties and film programs. 

Remember to visit YOUR public library in 1991 - Ipswich's other educational 
insti tution. 

******** 

PLANNING BOARD 

Stanley I. Bornstein, Chairman 

Elizabeth M. Ware, Town Planner 

The current economic recession has changed the role of the Planning board within 
this past year. Once reactive in reviewing site plans, subdivisions, and spe- 
cial permit applications, the Board has shifted direction and has taken a more 
pro-active role in planning for Ipswich's future. With the recent decision by 
the Board of Selectmen to have regularly scheduled "special" fall town meetings 
to address zoning and land use issues, the Board's role has become more diverse 
and future oriented. 

In comparison with previous years, the Planning Board reviewed relatively few 
subdivisions, site plans and special permits. While there were a number of 
smaller subdivisions (two to five lots), a 30-lot subdivision (Whispering Pines) 
and two site plan reviews (Safford Street and 4 South Main Street), the focus of 
the Board's review activity was within the Water Supply B district. Between 
special permit requests for drinking well installations and the seemingly 
constant change of businesses in the Mitchell Road industrial area, the Board has 
been busy in addressing watershed protection. In addition to these respon- 
sibilities, the Board has reviewed a number of applications under the Scenic 
Roads Act (M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 15-C) and has continued to monitor the 
projects approved in prior years. 

Working up to the special fall town meeting, the Board prepared a number of 
zoning articles to address difficulties within the present Protective Zoning 
By-Law. Parking and loading, signs, site plan review and screening were all 
revised and adopted with the goal of creating more comprehensive and 
up-to-date requirements. The major success at the fall town meeting was, 
however, the re-zoning of the Route One corridor. The Master Plan Commission, 
working with the Planning Board, was successful in altering the zoning from 
Industrial to Light Industrial, Planned Commercial and Rural Residence C, new 
zoning districts established to protect the scenic Route One corridor and to 
provide for more orderly and reasonable growth in the area. 

The Planning Board anticipates that with a fall 1991 town meeting a number of 
other zoning articles will be changed and encourages public participation in the 
process. In addition to possible re-zoning of several areas in Ipswich, further 
revisions are likely for the Protective Zoning By-Law. The Board welcomes this 
period of time to assess the present zoning of the Town and re-evaluate its 
future direction. 



-91- 



**•*•*•* 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief 

The Police Department would first like to thank you for all your support during 
the past year. As the result of your information and willingness to become 
"involved" many incidents were successfully brought to a conclusion. Moreover, 
because of your support on the override issue involving the position of a police 
officer, the Department remains at full strength. As the result of this sup- 
port, the Department is prepared to meet the challenges of crime control, traf- 
fic safety, drug control and the other social ills that fall to the police for 
solution and input. 

The past year the Police Department has made significant advances in the area of 
drug prevention and abuse. Our philosophy has been to address the problem in a 
three-prong manner. First, prevention of drug use must be undertaken by the 
police in conjunction with other community groups and individuals, but primarily 
the schools. Second, we must be supportive of adequate treatment for those 
individuals that preventative efforts fail to reach. Third, there must be 
effective enforcement of our laws to take the profit from drugs. After much 
debate, I am pleased to report that the School Department and the Police 
Department have signed a memorandum of understanding whereby the police will be 
involved in a curriculum of teaching our young people prevention. An officer 
will be assigned to the nationally recognized and remarkably successful drug and 
alcohol prevention program known as the Drug and Alcohol Resistance Education 
program or "DARE". In addition, the investigatory arm of the Department has 
been reorganized to put greater emphasis on drug investigations. Unheralded 
community groups and other governmental agencies have given the Department 
financial support in both these areas. 

Crime prevention and control and traffic education and enforcement remain the 
prime missions of the department. Unfortunately, as will be seen from the sta- 
tistics presented below, Ipswich still suffers from the plaque of crime. We 
continue to welcome and need input and concern from you the residents in 
reporting incidents of a suspicious nature. To combat persistent problems, 
complaints, and unacceptable accident frequency, we are directing patrols to 
troublesome locations. This is also true with regard to areas where there are 
frequent calls of disturbances or other illegal and suspicious activity. 

Although much remains to be done, the community remains safe throughout the day 
and night. The citizens and its police officers must continue to be vigilant 
and remain as partners in ridding ourselves of crime. Together much has been 
accomplished and will be in the ensuing year. 

STATISTICS FOR 1990 



Rape 


2 


Receiving Stolen 


Prop 


erty 


2 


Robbery 


1 


Mai icious Damage 






268 


Assaults 


72 


Weapons 






15 


Breaking & Entering 


106 


Sex Offenses 






15 


Larcenies 


253 


Narcotics 






10 


Motor Veh. Theft/Recovery 


54 


Offenses Against 


Fami 


iy 


180 


Arson 


1 


Operating Under 


Infl uence 


79 



-92- 



Forgery 


9 


Fraud 


7 


Embezzlement 


2 


Suspicious Incidents 


660 


Medical Aid 


208 


Accidents 


418 



Liquor Law Violations 
Protective Custody 
Disorderly Complaints 
Missi ng & Runaways 
Deaths & Suicides 
Parking Complaints 



27 

113 

788 

60 

14 

160 



Total Number of Calls 



9333 



******** 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the following divi- 
sions: Public Works Administration, Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, 
Building Maintenance Division, and Snow and Ice Control. Each division is 
charged with particular responsibilities relating to its duties. When addi- 
tional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, personnel are 
interchanged within the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public Works 
Divisions: 

Snow and Ice Control 



The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the winter months. 
The work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding, salting roadways, 
filling sand barrels, cleaning catch basins, clearing snow away from hydrants, 
and answering miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public 
Works crews during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery, Water, 
and Sewer Departments. This division responded to twenty-five different types 
of storms. 

Equipment Maintenance Division - Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 
All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Town Garage. At pre 
sent there are 32 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good 
operating condition to insure its availability when needed. Operation cost 
records showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be ascer- 
tained from the Public Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. 

Building Maintenance Division 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall and 
Municipal Garage throughout the year. There was some repair work done on the 
roof of the Town Hall and also some repair work done to the furnace. 

Highway Division - Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division, which is the largest in the Public Works Department, is 
charged with the maintenance and repairing of the Town's streets and drainage 
systems. The winter schedule consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and 
routine maintenance which does not require excavations. During the other three 
seasons, the men are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to 
street sweeping. 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the Town's drains, 
repairing sidewalks, and maintenance on all signs. 



-93- 



All catch basins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged drains were cleared. 
New storm drains were put in on Argil la Road, Heartbreak Road, North Ridge Road, 
and Winter Street. 

The following roads were hot topped: East Street and the sidewalk and Little 
Neck Road. 

There was crack sealing done on Little Neck Road, Jeffrey's Neck Road, and 
Linebrook Road (approximately 6 miles of road). 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area from April to 
December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of 
winter sand deposits. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces, and traffic lines were painted in the downtown 
areas. As in previous years, the crosswalks were painted green. Also, 142,239 
lineal feet of center lines and fog lines were painted. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1990. 

The Highway Division purchased one new pickup truck, a line painting machine, a 
traffic counter, and an arrowboard. 

Other projects included setting up voting booths for the election and setting up 
for the April Annual Town Meeting and the October Special Town Meeting. 

Forestry Department - Robert Comeau, Foreman 

Unfortunately, this is the final report of the Forestry Division. At the annual 
election it was decided to cease this Town function as we had known it. I would 
like to thank all the citizens for their support over the past years and espe- 
cially those who supported us this year. 

The mitigation of the Dutch Elm Disease has again been one of the principal con- 
cerns of the Forestry Division. Approximately 85 Elm trees with beetle infesta- 
tion were removed as well as Maples, Oaks, Lindens, and Pines. 

Each first grade student was given an ash tree to take, plant, and care for in 
observance of Arbor Day. About 317 trees were donated. 

The Forestry Division planted approximately 69 various types of trees around 
Town. 

Other work performed by the Forestry Division consisted of trimming and pruning 
trees, removing limbs, and cutting brush. 

The Forestry Division also set up for the Annual Town Meeting and Annual 
Election. 

******** 

RECREATION AND YOUTH DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

Programs and activities were organized for various age groups. For children 
there were summer playground and drama programs, swim, tennis, and golf lessons, 
Halloween Parade & Program, Holiday program, vacation week activities, summer 

-94- 



track, sand sculpture, and several trips (roller skating, Canobie Lake, Beverly 
Luau, Chuck E. Cheese, Cedarland Fun Center, movie theatre, Water Country). The 
Hershey track competition had 15 local youngsters qualify for a total of 21 
events at the State Meet. Activities for teens included skiing, miniature golf, 
roller skating, Xmas shopping, and trips to movies, Canobie Lake, Water Country 
and "Haunted" Hammond Castle. Trips and events were also organized twice a 
month during the school year for special needs youngsters in our local Saturday 
Recreation Program. 

Volleyball and basketball programs continued for adults as well as tennis 
lessons, ballroom dance classes, and Community Band. Family events included 
holiday carroling and show, the annual Marathon, a block dance, Community Band 
Concert, and civic events such as the Memorial Day Parade and the July 4th 
Children's Parade and Field Day. Senior citizen activities included trips to 
the Flower Show, "Nunsense", Quincy Market, Freeport, Maine, Rockingham Park, 
Lowell Heritage Park, Science Museum, mall shopping, Giordano's Dinner Theatre, 
and the Topsfield Fair, as well as a "1920's Day at Crane's Castle" planned by 
the high school students and staff. A billiards program continued on weekday 
mornings at the Memorial Building. 

Office activities included the issuing of over 300 permits for ballfields and 
tennis courts and scheduling various users of the Memorial Building. 
Registrations were handled for over 600 swim slots and numerous trips for dif- 
ferent age groups as well as the Marathon. A Life Skills Class of older teens 
from the Cape Ann Collaborative again used Memorial Building spaces. 

Affiliation continued with the National Youth Sports Coaching Association, and 
training was again provided for local volunteer coaches. Several were certified 
in baseball, softball, soccer, and basketball after attending sessions taught by 
the Recreation Director. 

Cooperation with the School Department allow a sharing of fields and facilities; 
and alliances were continued with veterans' groups, senior citizens, youth and 
adults sports leagues, adult education, Scout and Campfire groups, and the YMCA. 
Many town groups used the Memorial Building for meetings, registration sessions, 
and classes such as dog obedience and Girl Scout leader training. Coordination 
with the Great Neck Association resulted in new equipment at Great Neck Park 
purchased by Town appropriation and installed primarily by a volunteer work crew 
in September, then finished by Town workers and with donated sand and concrete. 
Plans for a proposed skateboarding area at Bialek Park were discussed, but 
numerous legal obstacles impeded any real progress. Lifeguard coverage at 
Pavilion Beach continued daily through the summer season, and a number of 
rescues were performed by staff members. Students were bused to Don Bosco for 
summer swim classes two sessions a day, and a new open swim time there for all 
ages was ^jery successful . 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director met regularly 
throughout the year to discuss programs, plans, facilities, and policies, and to 
chaperone some events. 

-95- 



******** 



SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Philip A. Kent, Shellfish Constable 

Thomas F. Dorman, Chairman, Shellfish Advisory Board 

The Shellfish Department was placed under the general supervision of the Police 
Chief during the past year. In the past, the Constable reported directly to the 
Town Manager. The organizational change is working quite well. The Constable 
and the Police can assist each other in law enforcement concerns; the Constable 
has assistance of staff; the public has access to the Constable through the 
Police Department's communication system; and general questions regarding 
shellfishing can be handled when the Constable is off duty. 

The proper management of the shellfish resource has been the primary focus of 
the department. Environment management and law enforcement management insure 
that the resource is properly used and not overly exploited. The Department 
works closely with the Selectmen's Shellfish Advisory Board and the 
Commonwealth's Department of Environmental Protection. Daily, the Constable 
insures that shellfish removed from the area are proper as to size and amount, 
and those involved in the function are properly licensed. Additionally, the 
flats are monitored to insure there is no adverse environmental impact such as 
over digging, and that the resource will remain viable. 

Pollution and seeking its control remain perplexing problems. Some advancements 
and general understanding of the sources have been made. Corrective measures 
with the assistance of other Town departments have been taken. Many issues, 
however, remain unresolved. 



******** 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey A. Simon, Chairman 

The past year brought the future orientation of the school system into its shar- 
pest focus. Throughout all levels, educating students for the 21st century 
became the standard for looking at our existing structure, at new programs, at 
different educational opportunities, and even at program reductions. I am 
pleased to note that through all of this, the strong forward movement of the 
success of our students continues. 

At the Doyon School, for example, the faculty and Principal Ken Cooper 
inaugurated several new initiatives, all aimed at keeping the unity of program 
and progress going. The students of Doyon read "A Million Minutes", and 
proclaimed their achievement with bright buttons. The school saw the first 
annual 100' s Days, when all of the different ways that 100 is significant were 
explored. The students of the school had the opportunity to publish their 
writing during Young Authors Week. The pride and sense of accomplishment 
experienced by the students seeing their own works displayed reinforce the 
importance of writing to so many other pursuits. 

At the Winthrop School, national recognition was received as the National School 
Public Relations Association presented awards for two outstanding programs. The 
"People Encouraging People" program featured the faculty and Principal Rebecca 
van der Bogart observing a student quietly, or in some instances not so quietly, 

-96- 



showing real encouragement to another student. This way of recognizing those 
many kind acts which usually go unnoticed, has set a dramatic tone for con- 
sideration and kindness. The second award went to the tremendously successful 
"Volunteers in School" program which has placed adult volunteers in meaningful 
roles in almost every classroom. The year also saw the opening of the newly 
refurbished cafeteria/auditorium. This was an effort undertaken with private 
funds raised by parent organizations, and now provides a permanent gallery where 
students, parents, faculty, and professional artists regularly exhibit their 
work. 

At the Ipswich Middle School, the path to the next century was marked by the 
inauguration of a new math program at all grade levels. This program stresses 
the critical thinking and reasoning skills which national organizations say will 
be so critical to the success of our students. Test scores showed dramatic 
improvement, the result of the emphasis that Principal Barry Hopping and the 
faculty nave put on improving curriculum and teaching. The year has also seen a 
tremendous increase in parental involvement in all aspects of the school. 
Strong parental involvement has been held to be one hallmark of great public 
schools. This was also the first full year for Mr. Hopping. He was able to 
preside over a smooth transition, adding his own style and standards to the 
Middle School . 

The focus on educating students for the 21st century was strongly felt at 
Ipswich High School as well. A review of the curriculum using this standard 
produced several changes, including a World Cultures Course and changing 
Industrial Arts to Technology Education. Test scores showed the fruits of the 
last several years' labor, as Advanced Placement Scores, SAT's, and perhaps the 
most important score, the Massachusetts Education Achievement Program, all 
showed continued and marked improvement. Principal Steve Fortado and the high 
school faculty should feel deservedly proud of the strong position that the High 
School enjoys on the North Shore. 

This year also saw the first need for and the first successful passage of a 
Proposition 2\ override. The entire school community is grateful for the con- 
fidence that the voters of Ipswich have shown and continue to show in their 
schools by passing a $200,000 override for school purposes. 

Superintendent Richard Thompson and all of us involved in the schools in Ipswich 
have committed ourselves to a standard which does not look at the world as it is 
today, or as it was when we went to school, but as it will be when this year's 
current kindergarten class graduates as the Class of 2003. It is out of this 
sincere conviction that we are working together to try to insure that the 
children of Ipswich will be strong, active adult contributors to their town and 
to their country by being prepared as well as they possibly can be. This is our 
responsibility to the next generation and its future. We appreciate the con- 
fidence and support that the people of Ipswich have shown to their schools. 



******** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Calendar Year 1990 was another year of change for the Ipswich School System. 
The focus of this change was in our own attitudes and performance. 

The Ipswich School System believes it has to become the best system it can 
possibly be. However, we have started to measure the "best" from a different 

-97- 



perspective. The children of this school system will be called upon to use all 
their newly learned skills in the twenty-first century. The twenty-first cen- 
tury is going to be different economically, socially and academically than the 
decades of the sixties, seventies and eighties. Our students will be part of a 
global whole with benefits going to the societies that have the most productive 
workers, managers and leaders. 

Therefore, the school system has engaged in the difficult process of trying to 
develop programs that will maximize our children's chances of success twenty 
years from now. That future requires a fundamental shift in the goals and out- 
comes of our school system. Listed below, you will find a series of activities 
and programmatic changes which we hope are the basis for redirecting the Ipswich 
School System. 

* Probably the most fundamental and far reaching change was the start of Phase 
II Curriculum Development. In order to prepare children for the 21st Century, a 
group of people must take the responsibility for researching the future skills 
necessary for our children and then develop a curriculum and instructional plan 
to teach our children these skills. That plan for dynamically improving our 
curriculum and schools for the future is now in place and starting to operate. 

* Increased technology in the schools and technology integration into most sub- 
ject areas is an ongoing effort. Students from grades 4 to 12 are increasingly 
involved in the uses and applications of technology. 

* The "Writing Process," which is a major improvement in the way writing skills 
are taught to students, has become an ongoing, successful instructional 
practice. 

* The opening of a branch office at the High School by the Ipswich Cooperative 
Bank marks a significant integration of the school system with the business com- 
munity. This joint venture should enhance our student employment success later 
in life. It should provide better services for the community and quicker 
response on the part of the schools to the needs of the business community. It 
also is one of the hallmarks of the future of education; i.e., the 
"connectedness of education" with the community, parents, and business to a 
degree unknown in the past. 

* 1990 saw the finish of a first year Russian Course by Satellite at Ipswich 
High School. The last half of 1990 saw the beginning of the second year 
Satellite Russian Course and planning for a Satellite Course in Japanese. 

* A policy which allows some parental choice of school and parental choice of 
teachers has been adopted by the Ipswich School Committee. 

* We have privatized the Day Care Center at the Ipswich High School and manage- 
ment of the Food Service Program. 

The list is much more extensive, but the above provides a variety of examples 
il 1 ustrati/ig the changes which have taken place in your school system. 

Lastly, I would like to remind you that these changes took place at a time when 
budgets were declining and when the community offset part of those declining 
revenues by granting an override to the school system. All school employees 
understand that we have to be frugal, but that will not prevent us from being 
best. 

-98- 



SY 89-90 


SY 90-91 


SY 91-92 


27 


24 


25 


130 


144 


140 


26 


26 


27 


129 


123 


155 


124 


131 


123 


127 


132 


138 


125 


133 


132 


121 


127 


138 


121 


122 


126 


121 


116 


120 


99 


121 


112 


81 


96 


113 


96 


86 


95 


107 


93 


85 


95 


98 


90 



Thank you for your support, suggestions, and involvement. We hope our school 
system will continue to make you proud and pleased with the student achievement 
that your tax dollars have purchased. 

ENROLLMENTS AND PROJECTIONS 
October 1 Count 

Grade 

Pre-School 
K 
R 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

TOTALS 1529 1572 1619 

******** 

PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

The calendar year 1990, the year of the 25th anniversary of the Doyon School, 
was one of exciting growth in instructional programs, stability in professional 
staff, and a slight increase in enrollment. 

With the addition of a Primary Special Needs program, the arrival of relatively 
large kindergarten class, Doyon enrollment has increased to 407 pupils. New to 
the staff this year were: 1) Mrs. Beth Freitas in Primary Special Needs. Mrs. 
Freitas came to us with many years of experience working with students with a 
variety of special developmental and learning needs. She holds a degree from 
Salem State College in Elementary Education and is currently in a Masters 
Degree program at Lesley College; 2) Mrs. Paula Alexander and Mrs. Sharon Green 
both of whom will be working with Mrs. Freitas. in the Primary Learning Class as 
instructional assistants; 3) Mr. Christopher Fitzpatrick in primary music. 
Mr. Fitzpatrick received a Bachelor of Arts in Music Education from Clarke 
College and a Masters of Music from the New England Conservatory; and 4) Mr. Bruce 
Rose as Part-Time Custodian. We are pleased to have everyone above on board - 
they are all super-contributors to the total Doyon School effort. 

In the area of curriculum, we keep moving towards 1) the increased use of mani- 
pulatives and a focus on problem solving in math; 2) more and more student 
writing and "publishing" of their own work and a continuation of the hardbound 
journal program (now K-3); 3) hands-on science; and 4) an increase in the use of 
"real" literature in the reading program with a list of specific titles of books 
to be taught or read aloud at each grade level. The past year has seen the 

-99- 



incorporation into our instructional program with a list of specific titles of 
books to be taught or read aloud at each grade level. The past year has seen 
the incorporation into our instructional program of several noteworthy 
schoolwide programs. "One-hundred's Day," a math commemoration of the 100th day 
of school was marked by a wide variety of math activities and numerous collec- 
tions of 100 objects. "Young Author's Week," during which each student 
published his/her own book, ended in a day of special activities including 
cross-grade book-sharing, puppetry, storytelling, and a parade of our favorite 
storybook characters. We also hosted several special author's visits and book- 
fairs. In the fall, we celebrated the 25th anniversary of Doyon and buried a 
time capsule with hundreds of modern-day relics to be unearthed in 2015 at Doyon's 
50th anniversary. The family picnic, the reception for staff alumni, and the 
commissioning of a portrait of former principal William Waitt were all part of 
the celebration. 

Standardized test scores continue to be exceptionally strong: 1) the average 
California Achievement test score for our pupils is at the 89th national percen- 
tile; 2) 99 percent of our students passed Massachusetts Basic Skills Tests; and 
3) our Massachusetts Educational Assessment tests were all at or above our com- 
parison score band with 19 of 25 scores at an all-time high. 

The Friends of Doyon has continued to provide the kind of support and assistance 
that have made them such an integral part of our operations. They have funded 
the hardbound journal program, sponsored assembly programs, parent and child 
training programs, assisted with the Doyon 25th, and have given us a helping 
hand in countless other ways. It just isn't possible to thank them enough for 
what they have done, and for what I know they will continue to do. 

It continues to be a pleasure for me to service the Doyon community. On behalf 
of everyone at Doyon, I would like to thank the citizens of Ipswich for their 
support. 



******** 



WINTHR0P SCHOOL 

M. Rebecca van der Bogert, Principal 

The calendar year 1990 has been one of challenge, recognition, and gratifica- 
tion. The greatest challenge has been to continue a process of growth in times 
of diminishing budget. Our student population has increased to 463, and we have 
been fortunate to add a Special Needs Preschool program through the funding of a 
Chapter 188 grant from the State Department of Education. 

Our staff has been engaged in the ongoing growth process of developing teaching 
strategies that are appropriate for students that will be employed in the 21st 
century. We have continued to focus on the development of our writing program, 
the use of math manipulatives, the use of novels in our reading program, and 
hands-on experiences in science. 

The school -was recognized nationally with two awards from the National School 
Public Relations Association. One was for the way in which our parents contri- 
bute to the school through our VIS (Volunteers in School) program and the other 
was for our P.E.P. campaign (People Encouraging People). 



-100- 



Our parent organization, the Friends of Winthrop, has contributed a tremendous 
amount to the school this year. They have sponsored an Ice Cream Social for the 
school community, sponsored a Run for Winthrop, assisted in renovating the 
playground, and supported our Special Programs and a stranger awareness program 
entitled Caution Without Fear. 

The staff at the Winthrop School has made a commitment to provide the highest 
quality of education possible to the children of Ipswich even in a time of 
financial crisis. We've been able to do this through the efforts of dedicated 
staff members, the generous time contributions of parents, and the support of 
town leaders. We thank everyone!!!! 



******** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 
Barry W. Hopping, Principal 

The 1990 calendar year was one of great change and innovation here at the 
Ipswich Middle School. First, we said good-bye and good luck to Mr. Ronald 
Landman, our principal for the past twelve years. Mr. Landman assumed a similar 
position at Swampscott Junior High School after several years of dedicated ser- 
vice to the youth of Ipswich. 

Due in large part to continued community involvement and support, we also bade a 
final farewell to some of our inadequate, ill -equipped classrooms. Most 
notably, our renovated media center/computer room has been the source of 
increased educational opportunities for our students. Under the direction of 
Media Specialist Mrs. Ethel Rogers, our sixth, seventh, and eighth graders have 
been trained in the latest computer and research technology. We also welcomed 
comprehensive renovations to the eighth grade science room. Mrs. Karen Festa, 
our eighth grade science teacher, is now able to conduct each lesson in a fully 
equipped lab. 

Teachers have dedicated themselves to further professional growth and develop- 
ment by attending numerous conferences and workshops. Staff development remains 
a high priority among faculty members and everyone has taken full advantage of 
available opportunities. "Cutting edge" curricula is only as good as the skills 
of those charged with its implementation. In that regard, we continue to pursue 
those strategies and methodologies which will best equip us for instruction in 
the twenty-first century. 

Our degree of community involvement and support continued to grow throughout the 
year. The parent organization, Friends of the Ipswich Middle School, sponsored 
a series of forums dealing with early adolescent issues. We also noted an 
increase in attendance at our monthly open house sessions as more parents sur- 
faced to discuss specific academic and social concerns regarding their children. 

Our academic, cultural, and athletic programs continue to flourish despite dif- 
ficult fiscal restraints. We've introduced a new mathematics program in all 
grades and continue to stress the importance of inter-disciplinary instruction. 
Our integration of special education/regular education students has gained us 
considerable recognition from around the New England area. Our Marine Studies 
program has expanded and further allows our students to experience "hands-on" 
activities in mapping and navigation, literature of the sea, and futuristic 

-101- 



planning of our ocean resources. This on-going educational immersion in "real 
world" issues can never be overlooked. Our cultural and athletic programs were 
all very successful and continued to garner tremendous participation from within 
our student population. Whether it was "Fiddler on the Roof", our honors 
reception, or our highly skilled and competitive sports teams, our students pro- 
vided us witn numerous highlights during the calendar year. Their genuine 
pride, spirit, determination, and enthusiasm was an inspiration to us all. 

We look forward to the coming year with greater hopes and expectations as we 
forge ahead to the new millennium. 



******** 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Stephen M. Fortado, Principal 

I am pleased to submit my sixth annual report to the citizens of Ipswich. 

The 1989-1990 school year began with 379 students enrolled in grades nine 
through twelve. Eighty-one freshmen replaced the ninety-one seniors who gra- 
duated on June 10. 

One of the highlights of the school year was the visit to Ipswich High School by 
Alan November, former National Teacher of the Year and an Educational Futurist. 
His insights and perceptions into future trends and how they will impact on our 
students' lives caused us to re-examine some of our basic assumptions. He com- 
pared American education to a driver speeding down a road with his eyes fixed on 
the rear-view mirror. We do our students a disservice in trying to recreate the 
schools of yesterday. It is far better to concentrate our efforts, says 
November, on teaching the skills our students will need to survive and succeed 
in the next century. Since his visit we have been concentrating our building- 
level staff development efforts on helping our staff translate future trends 
into our present-day programs. 

In April all of our seniors took the Massachusetts Educational Assessment 
Program (MEAP) Test. This test is given to all Massachusetts twelfth grade stu- 
dents every other year and tests the areas of reading, mathematics, science and 
social studies. All of us were very pleased to see Ipswich High School scores 
go up in every area over the 1988 scores: Reading went from 1390 to 1460, 
mathematics went from 1320 to 1370, science from 1360 to 1400, and social stu- 
dies from 1360 to 1430. While we may not be able to sustain an increase in each 
area every time we test our seniors, we hope the trend will be upward. 

In May, twenty-eight of our students took Advanced Placement examinations in 
eight different subjects: Art History, Studio Art, Calculus, English Literature 
and Composition, French Language, Physics, Spanish Language and U.S. History. 
Once again our students scored higher than the Massachusetts average in five of 
the eight subjects. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the students, faculty, parents, and 
citizens of Ipswich for their continued support of our efforts on behalf of all 
of the students of Ipswich High School. 

-102- 



******** 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Director 

Department of Special Services goals for the 1989-90 school year focused on: 

1. Increasing reading and math instructional skills of Special Needs 
Teachers in quality and delivery methods. 

2. To provide time and available resources to aid in the design and 
completion of Phase II of the Curriculum. 

3. To continue to manage issues of outside placements for accountability 
and cost effectiveness. 

4. To address recommendations made by the outside evaluators in the 
Ipswich Public Schools Special Education Evaluation dated July 1989. 

5. Increase opportunity for discussion of students, programming, and 
mutual issues with Middle and High School Special Services staff. 

These goals were in addition to ongoing support services and our immersion in 
all aspects of regular education, health programs, health education, team 
teaching and planning with regular class teachers, testing, screening, eva- 
luations for learning styles and needs, consultation and involvement in all the 
very exciting programs and extra curricular activities that each school has. 

During the 89-90 school year, the following took place: 

Number of: 

New referrals for Team Evaluation 60 
Team evaluations that resulted in new or 

continued placement 42 

Team evaluations that resulted in NO placement 18 

Team Re-evaluation of Individual Student Programs 82 

Annual Review of Individual Student Programs 214 

Screening of: 

3 year olds 35 

4 year ol ds . 16 
Kindergarten 146 

Total number of Special Needs Students serviced in 1989-90 335 
Number of Special Needs Students completing program goals 14 
Number of Special Needs Students graduating 12 

The Department received the following entitlement grants for which we must 
apply each year: 

Title VI B 94-142 $73,884.00 

Title I 89-313 7,500.00 

Early Childhood 13,730.00 

-103- 



In addition: 

A Chapter 188 Early Childhood Grant was funded for $53,346.00 

The Special Needs Parent Advisory Council was awarded 

a Commonwealth Inservice Grant for 881.00 

One of the most significant developments this year was the expansion and 
involvement of the Ipswich Special Needs Parent Advisory Council. Memberships 
consists mostly of parents of special needs children but welcomes staff, admin- 
istrators and parents of non-special needs students. 

******** 

TOWN CLERK 

Frances A. Richards 

Town Clerk Isobel N. Coulombe retired May 31, 1990, and Assistant Town Clerk 
Frances A. Richards was appointed Interim Town Clerk as of June 1, 1990, for a 
one-year term. As of July 1st, office staff was cut back to one full-time and 
one part-time position due to budget cuts. On August 29th, Elise W. Graves was 
hired as a part-time clerk (17.5 hours/week) in the Town Clerk's office. 

The new IBM computer purchased in 1989 with the Town Clerk's software from the 
New England Municipal Resource Center in Vermont has saved a great deal of time 
and money recording, updating, and printing the Town census, voter list, street 
list, jury list, dog list, school list, and all other lists requested from the 
Town Clerk's office. Word processing software (Word Perfect) was installed this 
year and will be used to prepare the budget, record Town Meeting minutes, and set 
up reports for licenses and permits. 

1990 Population from the Town Census as of June 1, 1990 - 12,791. 

The Federal Census taken in 1990 reported a population of 11,098. This figure 
was challenged by the Town on September 18, 1990, and later amended to 11,873. 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past three years: 

1988 1989 1990 
Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 

There were 71 females and 76 males born to Ipswich residents in 1990. Of the 
total number of deaths recorded (61 females, 40 males), 90 were residents. Of 
the 108 marriages recorded in Ipswich, 40 took place elsewhere; in 25 marriages, 
one party was non-resident and in 20 marriages, both parties were non-resident. 



135 


136 


147 


117 


104 


101 


91 


100 


108 



Dog Licenses 


1988 


1989 


1990 


Males 


596 


626 


570 


Females 


57 


66 


67 


Spayed Females 


498 


529 


552 


Kennel s 


22 


32 


32 



-104- 



The 1990 census found 1410 dogs in Ipswich. 

1988 1989 1990 



Shel If ish Licenses 








& Permits 


128 


137 




Resident Yearly 


154 


Resident Family 


84 


71 


110 


Resident Commercial 


32 


41 


93 


Non-Resident Yearly 


41 


36 


24 


Non-Resident Daily 


16 


8 


23 



Of the 93 Commercial Clam Licenses, 41 were issued after the filing deadline 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen and were called "Hardship" 
Commercial Licenses. Twenty-four Lifetime Permits "Over 60 Free Recreational" 
were also issued to residents. 



Sporting Licenses 


1990 


Fishing 


234 


Hunting 


75 


Sporting 


99 


Free Sporting (Over 70) 


34 


Trapping 


2 


Archery Stamps 


51 


Waterfowl Stamps 


117 


Wildlands Stamps 


42 



Total 654 

Revenue sent in to the Division of Fisheries & Wildlife for Sporting Licenses 

$6,199.00. 

Revenue 1990 

Marriage Licenses $1,605.00 

Certified Copy Fees 6,426.75 

Recording Fees 5,073.25 

Shellfish Licenses & Permits 25,153.50 

Dog Licenses 3,715.10 

Sporting Licenses 6,199.00 

Antiques & Old Metals Licenses 25.00 

Auction Permits 4,200.00 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 1,700.00 

Bowling Alley License 80.00 

Class I Licenses 300.00 

Class II Licenses 1,700.00 

Class III License 100.00 

Common Victualler Licenses 1,225.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 1,100.00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 540.00 

Liquor Licenses 41,645.00 

Taxi Licenses 80.00 

Flammables Licenses 305.00 

Sales - By-Laws, Maps and Regulations 806.00 

Sales - Misc. Ipswich Booklets 453.00 

Fortune Teller License 2.00 

Raffle Permits 50.00 

Sale of Street Lists 1,177.00 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 120.00 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 1,720.00 

Miscellaneous 55.50 

Total $105,610.10 

-105- 



******** 

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 
Board of Registrars: 

Peter M. Ross, Chairman 

Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

Mary Maloney 

Edmund Traverso 

Town Meeting & Elections for 1990: 

February 5, 1990 - Special Town Election (Unexpired term - Board of Selectmen) 

with 1592 votes cast. 
April 2, 1990 - Annual Town Meeting with 44 articles. 
April 9, 1990 - Annual Town Election with 3565 votes cast. 
April 28, 1990 - Recount - Ballot Question 5 (Failed) 
September 18, 1990 - State Primary Election with 3508 votes cast. 
October 22, 1990 - Special Town Meeting with 18 articles. 
November 6, 1990 - State Election with 6124 votes cast. 

The Board of Registrars held twenty-three meetings to certify petitions and 
nomination papers, register new voters, check voters at town meetings, check 
voters and tally results for elections and call NES with results of state pri- 
mary and election. The first outside voter registration sessions were held in 
1990 at the Cape Ann Market, Cable Gardens, and Oak Hill. Two members of the 
League of Women Voters were deputized to register new voters at the Colonial 
Drive Complex. 

Registerd Voters as of October 10, 1990: 



PRECINCT 


DEMOCRAT 


REPUBLICAN 


INDEPENDENT 


TOTAL 


1 


474 


522 


1015 


2011 


2 


516 


420 


1117 


2053 


3 


348 


348 


1039 


1735 


4 


503 


354 


1072 


1929 


Total s 


1841 


1644 


4243 


7728 



Note: An increase of 307 voters from the previous year. 

******** 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

Nineteen-ninety was a year of increased activity for the Town's Legal 
Department. There was a substantial increase in enforcement activity, fre- 
quently resulting in litigation, in the Building Inspector's Department. It was 
necessary -to sue many landowners in Superior Court because of their refusal to 
comply with Cease and Desist Orders issued by the Building Inspector. With 
increasingly difficult economic times, the Building Inspector has found it more 
difficult to compel voluntary compliance with the Town's Zoning By-Law. The 
Mitchell Road area and Special Permits which the Zoning By-Law requires be 
obtained from the Planning Board were the source of several law suits, with the 
Building Inspector as Plaintiff on behalf of the Town. 

-106- 



The location, site selection procedure, and Comprehensive Permit procedure ini- 
tiated by the Ipswich Housing Authority and the Executive Office of Communities 
and Development pertaining to a Linebrook Road site for twenty units of low 
income housing generated a great deal of participation by several Town 
committees, neighbors, and proponents. At the conclusion of the local process, 
a Comprehensive Permit was issued by the Board of Appeals; an appeal was taken 
by the Ipswich Housing Authority; this appeal is presently pending. 

The Board of Selectmen, showing concern for utilizing the Town's licensing and 
permit granting procedures as mechanisms for enforcing the Zoning By-Law, ini- 
tiated a policy of requiring that all original applicants and renewal applicants 
for most, if not all, licenses and permits granted by the Town be in compliance 
with the Zoning By-Law as an essential condition of receiving a license. It was 
decided to seek favorable Town Meeting action by means of two by-laws to 
establish a firm legal footing for this new procedure. In this manner, it is 
hoped and expected that the enforcement burdens on the Building Inspection 
Department will be reduced by a new, more thorough licensing procedure. 

The Town continued to experience a modest and steady volume of claims against it 
under the Municipal Tort Claims Act, Chapter 258, of the General Laws. 

The complete financial failure of a major residential and recreational complex 
in the Town - the Ipswich Country Club - caused considerable legal and financial 
confusion, involving the rights of the golf course, club house, foreclosing mor- 
tagee bank, individual lot owners, and the unpaid real estate and other taxes to 
the Town. It is expected that this project will finally be resolved during 1991 
or 1992. 

Various difficulties and confusion concerning application and interpretation of 
the Town's Sign Zoning By-Law led the October 1990 Town Meeting to adopt an 
entirely new, considerably more detailed, Sign Zoning By-Law which was approved 
by the Attorney General in due course and which is presently in effect. The new 
Sign Zoning By-Law was aimed at reducing the quantity of difficult, sometimes 
ambiguous, decisions which the Building Inspector was required to make on a 
regular basis. 

The Board of Appeals continued to generate a reasonably constant volume of judi- 
cial work. Most of these appeals were by disappointed applicants or abutting 
neighbors to a Board decision arising in the Great Neck area where a Special 
Permit is necessary to make most physical changes to any of the homes on Great 
Neck, because of actions taken by the 1977 Town Meeting, rendering all Great 
Neck lots non-conforming. 

The continuing application of the constraints of Proposition 2i to the Town's 
budget and finances, interpreting various hypertechnical limits, and the possi- 
bility of frequent overrides, continued to generate considerable legal work per- 
taining to the mechanics of this 1980 statute and its annual application to the 
Town. 



-107- 



******** 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

The year 1990 has brought with it some challenges and growth for the 
Treasurer/Collector's office. 

Due to the depressed economy, collections were down, resulting in a number of 
properties taken into Tax Title. 

With the installation of a computer terminal at the counter, inquiries by the 
taxpayer can be promptly handled. The personal computer has greatly increased 
our ability for more detailed reports and record keeping of receipts. 

We bid a fond farewell to Gloria Kl imaszewski , who has faithfully served the 
Town for over 20 years, and wish her a pleasant retirement. 

I wish to express my appreciation to Joanna Lendh and Susan LeMieux for their 
effort in keeping the office running smoothly in the face of staff reductions. 
Recognition should also be given to Deputy Tax Collector William Handren. 

Interest earned on investments: $199,163.12 
Beach Stickers: 16,008.50 

Tax Title Redemption: 184,500.72 

******** 

WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENTS 
James E. Chase, Engineer 

The following extensions were added to our distribution system in 1990: 

Brown's Manor off High Street 600' - 8" CLDLI 

Bullbrook Lane 555' - 8" CLDI 

Fille Street Extension 565' - 8" CLDI 

Pineswamp Road 1565' - 10" PVC 

Pond's Edge Lane 760' - 8" CLDI 

Water Division 

Charles Mantsourani, Filtration Superintendent 

Gilbert J. Elliott, Water Foreman 



1987 1988 1989 1990 



New Meters Installed 
Meters Replaced 
Services Turned Off 
Services Turned On 
New Services 
Services Discontinued 
Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced 
New Water Mains Installed 
Total Length of Mains 



114 




76 


82 




70 


109 




154 


181 




71 


56 




98 


98 




73 


154 




135 


142 




152 


76 




77 


58 




40 


4 




3 


1 







13 




29 


1 




8 


1 




3 


4 




1 


7,700' 


21 


,750' 


730' 


4 


,045' 


441,010' 


462 


,760' 


563,490' 


467 


,535' 



-108- 



Water Services 
Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 
Summer Services 



Water Usage 
Dow's Reservoir 
Brown's Well 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Wei 1 
Essex Road Well 
Fellows Road Well 
Total Water Usage 



Highest Day: 

Highest Day: 

Highest Day: 

Highest Day: 



7/20/87 
7/08/88 
7/27/89 
7/18/90 



3,776 


3,852 


3,932 


4,002 


109 


94 


87 


57 


15 


15 








1987 


1988 


1989 
252,286,000 


1990 


25,754,000 


124,466,000 


257,948 


103,760,000 


91,946,000 


31,072,000 


54,887 


58,172,000 


31,225,000 


712,000 


7,438 


30,781,000 


21,617,000 


6,557,000 


19,273 


55,505,000 


37,738,000 


15,525,000 


23,190 


45,702,000 


40,356,000 


19,479,000 


36,893 


319,674,000 


348,351,000 


325,631,000 


399,629 


2,413,000 


2,004,000 


2,047,000 





3,061 



Wastewater Division 

Timothy J. Henry, Superintendent 

Wastewater Treated Daily 

(Average Gallons) 
Total Wastewater Treated 

(Gallons) 
Septage (Gallons) 

Highest Daily Flow: 4/06/87 

Highest Daily Flow: 2/20/88 

Highest Daily Flow: 4/16/89 

Highest Daily Flow: 10/24/90 

Total Precipitation (Inches) 

Highest Daily Prec. 4/04/87 

Highest Daily Prec. 3/26/88 

Highest Daily Prec. 10/20/89 

Highest Daily Prec. 10/23/90 

Treatment 

Average Influent Suspended 

Sol ids mgl 
Average Effluent Suspended 

Sol ids mgl 
Average Percent Removal, S.S. 
Average Influent BOD ppm 
Average Effluent BOD ppm 
Average Percent Removal BOD 
Average Effluent pH 



1987 



70 



1988 



1989 



1990 



1,145,000 


1,095,000 


952,000 1,071,000 


417.925 


400.880 


347.630 390,293 


485,500 


681,390 


1,081,450 782,400 


2,568,000 


1,983,000 


1,959,000 

2,063,000 


51.35 


39.10 


46.40 51.85 


4.25 


2.30 





80 



1.80 



89 



3.50 



85 



3.3 


6.7 


15 


11.4 


95 


92 


84 


87 


121 


135 


157 


125 


7.4 


9.3 


23 


6.1 


94 


93 


85 


89 


6.9 


7.0 


7.3 


7.2 



-109- 






Sludge Dewatering 
Digested Sludge to Vacuum 

Filters (Gallons) 2,122,100 2,056,000 2,374,955 2,085,870 

Average Digested Sludge 

Percent Solids 2.2 1.9 2.4 1.8 

Vacuum Filter Sludge Cake to 

Disposal (Pounds) 375,055 318,551 465,403 317,438 

Average Vacuum Filter Sludge 

Cake % Solids 11.4 11.0 13.7 12.9 

1987 1988 1989 1990 



Chemical s 

Disinfection: Total Chlorine 
(Pounds) 5,475 5,602 6,529 6,933 

Sludge Dewatering: 

Lime (Pounds) 86,958 106,752 124,642 102,888 

Ferric Chloride (Pounds) 25,454 37,800 35,866 27,070 

Collection System 

New Sewer Connections 25 22 13 7 

Total Sewer Connections 1,489 1,511 1,524 1,531 

******* 

WITTIER REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Karen H. Prentice, Superintendent/Director 
Eugene A. Hailson, Ipswich Representative 

Alhittier Regional Vocational Technical High school is entering its eighteenth 
/ear. To date, we have graduated 4653 students from a regular day school 
urogram and 672 students from our post secondary courses. 

In accordance with the provisions of the School Improvement Law (Chapter 188), 
dhittier has accomplished the following: 

1. The School Improvement Council 

The School Improvement Council comprised of administrators, teachers, 
parents, and students has met and will oe recommending projects using grant 
monies in the amount of $1,830.00. 

Recently, Whittier Regional has implemented procedures, installed systems, 
nodified existing systems and devices, and is proceeding with the remainder of 
over $540,000 in energy grants. The measures involved are savings of energy 
through exhaust air heat recovery, room and shop air circulation systems, 
lighting fixtures and lamp replacement, sawdust recovery filters and heated air 
recirculation, and conversion to gas energy alternatives. These measures have 
enabled the school to decrease its energy needs and, therefore, result in 
savings to the communities. 

The most significant change in this past school year was the retirement of 
Richard M. Kay, Superintendent/Director, and the hiring of Karen H. Prentice to 
replace him. Ms. Prentice comes with a strong background in Vocational 
Education, having most recently served as the Director of Vocational Education 
for the City of Cambridge. Before that she had served in Administration at the 



-110- 



Boys 


Girls 


2 


5 


8 


1 





1 


7 


2 



Minuteman Regional Vocational School. Ms. Prentice is well versed in the proce 
dures for gaining competitive grants for public schools from both private and 
public sources. 

In the few short months she has been at Whittier, there have been some very 
significant changes brought about. Among these has been the formation of a con 
sortium with other vocational schools and Northern Essex Community College to 
seek out alternative sources of funding, and a complete restructuring of the 
schools administration to make it more effective. I am confident that her 
leadership will be a positive force on the school and the communities it serves 

The enrollment for the Evening school from your community: 6 

The October 1, 1989 Day School Enrollment: 

Grade 9 

Grade 10 

Grade 11 

Grade 12 

1990 Graduates - 8 

The cost to your community for the school year 1989-1990 was $115,012. 

******** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1990, 66 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board of Appeals. There were 
43 requests for Special Permits, of which 42 were granted. There were 8 
requests for variances, all of which were denied. There were 9 appeals, of 
which 5 were affirmed, 4 reversed. Two comprehensive permits were granted. 
Four petitions were withdrawn or dismissed. 

During the year, Dan Lunt was re-appointed as a regular member for a five-year 
term. John Verani and Joseph R. Petranek were re-appointed as associate members 
for a one-year term. Jim Theodosopoulos was re-elected chairman, and Dana Jordan 
was elected vice-chairman. 

******** 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Benjamin Fierro III, Chairman 

The work of the Master Plan Commission in 1990 was highlighted by the passage of 
a corridor protection zoning by-law for Route 1. Approved by Town Meeting 
voters last fall, the by-law was the product of over two years of effort by the 
Commission. Technical assistance in the drafting of the by-law was provided by 
Town Planner Elizabeth Ware and the consulting firm of Connery Associates. 
Additional help was given by many volunteers, particularly Arthur Knight, without 
whom this effort would not have been successful. 



-Ill- 



The corridor by-law adopted on October 22, 1990, re-zoned the Route 1 industrial 
district into three new districts: a limited industrial (LI) district (south of 
Linebrook Road, easterly side, to Topsfield); a rural residential C district 
(RRC) (generally south of Linebrook Road, westerly side); and a planned commer- 
cial (PC) district (north of Linebrook Road, easterly and westerly sides, to 
Rowley). The intent of the by-law is to protect environmental resources, pre- 
serve natural landscapes, provide for more compatible types of uses, and promote 
appropriate business development in this part of Ipswich. 

Last year the Master Plan Commission spent a significant amount of time 
discussing and evaluating the proposal of the Housing Authority to develop 20 
units of family housing on Linebrook Road. The charter of the commission is to 
plan for the long-term growth of Ipswich consistent with its small town charac- 
teristics. Consequently, while the Master Plan Commission supported the goal of 
providing greater housing opportunities for all persons, it opposed the project 
because of its belief that the density of the project - with its attendant need 
to install a sewer force main - was contrary to sound land use principles. 

In the coming year, the Commission will continue its work on these and other 
growth issues. 

Finally, the Master Plan Commission saw further changes to its membership in 
1990 with the resignation of Richard McKinnon, Robert McNeil and Dana Jordan and 
the appointment of Irene Josephson, Donald Turbide and Barbara Ostberg. 

******** 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 51.55 of the 
Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the Federal Register on October 17, 
1983. Section 51.55 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals 
because of their handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advises the public, employees and job appli- 
cants that it does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in 
admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and 
activities . 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) as the con- 
tact to coordinate efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries should be 
directed to: 

Name: George E. Howe 
Office: Town Manager 
Address: Town Hall, South Main Street 
Ipswich, MA 01938 
Phone Number: (508)356-4848 

Hours: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Mondays 

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. 
8 a.m. - 12 noon Fridays 



-112- 



FEOFFEES OF TI IE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Balance, July 1, 1989 
Cash Received 
Expenditures 
Balance, June 30, 1990 



13,482.66 
329,532.96 
331,247.82 

11,767.80 



Little Neck, Land Valuation 
Buildings - Community Center & Barn 
Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 
On Deposit - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 
On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 



18,371,700.00 

75,600.00 

11,767.80 

2,000.00 

1.407.82 



18.462,475.62 



SCHEDULE I 
CASH RECEIPTS 
Tuly 1.1989 - Tune 30. 1990 



Building & Land Taxes 

Rents 

Water Loan 

Late Payment Interest & Miscellaneous 



244,643.82 

51.000.00 

33,500.00 

389.14 



SCHEDULE A 
RECONCILIATION OF CASH RECEIPTS 
Balance, July 1, 1989 
Cash Receipts - Schedule I 

Expenditures - Schedule II 



13,482.66 
329.532.96 
343.015.62 
331.247.82 

11,767.80 



-113- 



Taxes 



Town of Ipswich 



SCHEDULE II 

EXPENDITURES 

IulyI,I989 - Iune30, 1990 



244,643.82 



Repairs & Upkeep 
Water 

Wharf & Docks 
Playgrounds 
Tree Work 
Maintenance 
Speed Bumps 



36,867.40 
1,978.86 
1,015.00 
1,470.00 
1,212.75 
1,475.00 



Salaries & Expenses 
Salaries 
Transportation 
Police 

Office Supplies 
Meetings 
Telephone 
Legal 

Loan Payments 
Loan Interest 
Tax abatement refunds 



5,500.00 
500.00 

3,966.57 
611.21 
181.00 
182.02 

3,569.00 

27,000.00 

293.96 

781.23 

331.247.82 



-114- 



TRUSTEES CF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENT OF FUND ACTIVITY 

July 1, 1989 to June 30, 1990 



I. BOOK FUND AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 

Balance - July 1, 1989 

Contributions : 
Interest Income: 
Expenditures : 
Books 

Balance - June 30, 1990 



$13,653.36 

200.00 
886.93 

(2,074.00) 

$12,666.29 



II. IPSWICH SPEAKS FUND 

Balance - July 1, 1989 

Interest Income: 
Balance - June 30, 1990 



$ 1,098.04 

86.74 

$ 1,184.78 



III. LIBRARY TRUST FUND 



Balance July 1, 1989 



Expenditures : 

Design Fees 

(Air Conditioning) 



$ 45,087.94 
(5,337.00) 



Interest Income 

Balance - June 30, 1990 

Augustine Heard Fund $10,638.56 

Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 1,326.80 

Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 654.66 

Abby L. Newman Fund 3,983.50 

George Spiller Fund 1,121.00 

Daniel Treadwell Fund 25,798.00 



3,771.58 



$43,522.52 



-115- 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on hand January 1, 1990 $31,665.86 

Income from funds for year 1990 as follows: 

Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate 2,953.20 

Expenditures for the year 1990 as follows: 

Project Adventure, Inc. 

Ipswich Middle School 3,000.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1991 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-Operative Bank Money Market Certificate $31,619.06 



TO: THE CITIZENS OF IPSWICH 

FROM: BARRY M. BOYCE, TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



During Fiscal Year 1990, the Accounting Department took great steps toward 
solving some long standing fiscal problems. Three audit reports were issued 
leaving only FY1990 to be completed. These audit reports contained many 
adjustments and gave us a much better picture of our financial standing. The 
current schedule of audits will be up-to-date by the end of 1991. 

Please note the audit adjusted figures in the following exhibits and schedules. 
These figures have been audit adjusted through the end of FY 1989 and reflect the 
activity through the end of FY1990. 

As always the Accounting Department staff, Cyntnia Burns and Carol Poirier, per- 
formed their jobs well in excess of their job descriptions. 



116- 





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